Isaac Hodgson, Jr., Architect

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Indianapolis, Indiana, 1882; Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1882-1887; Omaha, Nebraska, 1887-1892; and Portland, Oregon, 1890-1893

Nothing of a biographical nature is known of Isaac Hodgson, Jr., except that he was son of Isaac Hodgson and Mary Ann Edwards Hodgson. He joined his father’s practice, presumably in Indianapolis, Indiana, then became a named partner in the firm by the time they moved the practice to Minneapolis, Minnesota, ca. 1882. Isaac, Jr., opened the Omaha office of the firm in 1887, and then also practiced there as well as in Portland, Oregon, as an individual.[5][6][15][12] In terms of currently available information, he disappears from the scene in 1893.[d]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Educational & Professional Associations

____-1882: architect, Isaac Hodgson, Architect, Indianapolis, Indiana.

1882-1887: architect and partner, Hodgson & Son, Architects, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

1887-1892: architect and partner, Hodgson & Son, Omaha, Nebraska.[b]

1890-1893: architect, Portland, Oregon.[5][6][15][12]

Other Associations

1894: employed George Robinson Dean (1864-1919), Architect.[20:5]

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Omaha, Nebraska, 1890-1891

Buildings & Projects

U. S. National Bank (1887), 1203 Farnam, Omaha, Nebraska.[10][12][a] (DO09:0123-048)

Fred Nye house (1887), 1502 S 10th, Omaha, Nebraska.[9][11] (DO09:0115-002)

Brown Building (1889), southeast corner 16th & Douglas, Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

National Bank of Ashland (1889), Ashland, Nebraska.[18] (SD01-059) National Register narrative

Commercial Building, (1890), 418 S. 13th St, Omaha, Nebraska.[11] (DO09:0121-045)

Chamber of Commerce Bldg (1890-1893), southwest Stark between 3rd & 4th Ave, Portland, Oregon.[5][13][15][c]

Charles Dietz House (1891), 428 S. 38th St, Omaha, Nebraska.[18][11] (DO09:0319-013)

House (1891), 3177 Davenport St., Omaha, Nebraska.[11] (DO09:0212-061)

William's Building (ca. 1891), Omaha, Nebraska.[19]

Isaac Hodgson, Jr. house (1891), 584 Elizabeth St, Portland, Oregon.[2][14][17]

Loewenberg mansion (1891; demolished 1960), SW Park Place near Washington Park, Portland, Oregon.[3][16][12]

"Hill-ton" Northrup Place (ca. 1891), Portland, Oregon.[1]

James W. Savage Apartment houses (ca. 1891), Omaha, Nebraska.[7]

A Residence at Omaha (ca. 1891), Omaha, Nebraska.[8]

United Bank (ca. 1892), Portland, Oregon.[4]

Notes

a. Architect of Record, Hodgson & Son, Omaha, Nebraska.[10][11]

b. Isaac Hodgson, Jr., was resident in Omaha, 1887-1888, while his father was listed by the Omaha city directories as resident in Minneapolis, Minnesota those years. In 1890-1891, the classified section of the directories listed only Isaac Hodgson, Jr., Architect, while in 1892 the listing was for Hodgson & Son. Isaac Hodgson, Sr., was listed as resident in Omaha only for the years 1889 and 1892. Other sources, below, indicate that Isaac, Jr., was also practicing alone during this time, both in Omaha and Portland, Oregon.

c. Attributed to Hodgson & Son.[13]

d. A search of the United States Federal Censuses, 1860-1920, failed to find Isaac, Jr. at all.

References

1. Isaac Hodgson, Jr., Archt. "The 'Hill-ton' Northrup Place, Portland, Oregon," American Architect & Building News 34 (1891), 15, pl. 823.

2. _____. “I. Hodgson house, Portland Heights, Portland, Oregon,” American Architect & Building News 34 (1891), 43, pl. 825.

3. _____. “Residence for Julius Loewenberg, Esq., Portland, Oregon,” American Architect & Building News 36 (1892), 46, pl. 851.

4. _____. “United Bank Bldg., Portland, Oregon,” American Architect & Building News 36 (1892), 185, pl. 860.

5. _____. “The Chamber of Commerce, Portland, Oregon,” American Architect & Building News 33 (1891), pl. 822.

6. Isaac Hodgson, Jr., Archt., Omaha & Portland. “The Brown Bldg., Omaha, Nebraska,” Inland Architect & News Record 19:2 (1892), plate.

7. I. Hodgson, Jr., Archt. “Block of Houses for James W. Savage, Omaha, Nebraska,” Inland Architect and News Record XVIII:2 (Sept 1891), plate.

8. _____. “Design for a Residence at Omaha, Nebraska,” Inland Architect & News Record 28:2 (Sept 1891), plate.

9. Landmarks, Inc., An Inventory of Historic Omaha Buildings (Omaha: City of Omaha and Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission, 1980), 44.

10. John Grant, Glimpses of Omaha (Omaha: D. D. Dunbar, 1888), 50.

11. City of Omaha Planning Department, Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission, Database, Query on Architects, May 20, 2002; courtesy of Lynn Meyer, Preservation Planner. 12. University of Oregon, Digital Libraries, Architecture and the Allied Arts Library, accessed August 17, 2012, “Building Oregon: Architecture of Oregon & the Pacific Northwest,” file pna_23185 http://boundless.uoregon.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/archpnw&CISOPTR=21613&CISOBOX=1&REC=1

13. "Buildings of Hodgson & Son (Minneapolis)," Phorio.com, accessed August 16, 2012, http://en.phorio.com/hodgson-son,_minneapolis,_united_states

14. Chris Wilson, “Isaac Hodgson Jr. Home Portland, Oregon,” Old Photos of Architecture (August 5, 2012), accessed August 15, 2012, http://asitwasarchitecture.blogspot.com/2012/08/isaac-hodgson-jr-home-portland- oregon.html

15. University of Oregon, Digital Libraries, Architecture and the Allied Arts Library, accessed August 16, 2012, “Building Oregon: Architecture of Oregon & the Pacific Northwest,” file pna_07362.jpg http://boundless.uoregon.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/archpnw&CISOPTR=9668&CISOBOX=1&REC=9

16. Chris Wilson, “Loewenberg Mansion,” Old Photos of Architecture (May 27, 2011), accessed August 16, 2012, http://asitwasarchitecture.blogspot.com/2011/05/loewenberg-mansion.html

17. University of Oregon, Digital Libraries, Architecture and the Allied Arts Library, “Building Oregon: Architecture of Oregon & the Pacific Northwest,” file pna_21864.jpg, architect’s drawing from American Architect and Building News (October 17, 1891), accessed August 16, 2012, http://boundless.uoregon.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/archpnw&CISOPTR=20824&CISOBOX=1&REC=3

18. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

19. “Entrance to William's BLDG,” American Architect & Building News (May 16, 1891), 15.

20. Dean, Arthur Randall, "Life of Arthur Randall Dean," TS. (July 1933): 7pp. Copy in Doane College Archives.

Other Sources

A collection of images associated with “Isaac Hodgson” is accessed August 17, 2012, available at http://www.google.com/search?q=%22isaac+hodgson%22+architect&start=10&hl=en&client=firefox-a&sa=N&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&prmd=imvnso&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&ei=EhgsUJ_3JKqMyAGKo4GYDQ&ved=0CEcQsAQ4Cg&biw=1218&bih=742

See “Isaac Hodgson (architect),” at the RTBot-Real Time Information website, http://www.rtbot.net/Isaac_Hodgson_(architect) Accessed August 15, 2012.

John Grant, Glimpses of Omaha (Omaha: D. D. Dunbar, 1888), 50.

Page Citation

D. Murphy, “Isaac Hodgson, Jr., Architect,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, January 22, 2015. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, June 1, 2020.


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