Craig A. Harmon (1911-1976), Architect

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Scottsbluff, Nebraska; Seattle, Washington

Craig Harmon was born in Redfield, South Dakota on December 10, 1911.[2][3][4] He received his Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from the University of Denver in 1935, at the age of 23.[2][3][4] In 1936, Harmon became married, a union that would later produce two children.[2][3][4] Harmon continued his education at the University of Nebraska in 1938, and went on to work at the firm, Smith, Hinchman & Grylis from 1941-1942.[2][3][4] Harmon also worked for Boeing Airplane Company from 1943-1946, before establishing his own firm, Hehnke & Harmon which became Harmon, Pray & Detrich in 1946.[2][3][4] Harmon died on May 13, 1976.[1]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Scottsbluff, Nebraska, 1940

Educational & Professional Associations

1935: Bachelor of Arts, Architecture, University of Denver, Colorado.[2][3][4]

1938: student, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[2][3][4]

1941-1942: Smith, Hinchman & Gryils.[2][3]

1943: Wyatt C. Herrick.[2][3]

1943-1946: Boeing Airplane Company.[2][3][4]

1946: architect and partner, Hehnke & Harmon, Architects.[2][3]

1946-19__: Harmon, Pray & Detrich.[2][3][4]

Buildings & Projects

Ordinance Area (1954), U.S. Army Eng, Ft, Lewis, Washington.[2][3]

Infirmary (1954), U.S. Army Eng. Eielson A.F.B, Alaska.[2][3]

Materials Handling Building (1955), Boeing Airplane Company, Seattle, Washington.[2][3]

Office Building (1955), Puget Sound Power and Light Company, Seattle, Washington.[2][3]

Office Building (1955), Boeing Airplane Company, Seattle, Washington.[2][3]

Seattle Labor Temple Building (1955), Seattle, Washington.[2]

Rehabilitation.Center for Blind (1963), Seattle, Washington.[4]

Seattle City Light Systems Operation Center (1963), Seattle, Washington.[4]

Freedom House (1964), Seattle, Washington.[4]

Youth Service Center (1966), Everett, Washington.[4]

Snohomish County Courthouse (1967), Everett, Washington.[4]

Notes

References

1. AIA Historical Directory of American Architects: A Resource Guide to Finding Information About Past Architects, accessed May 11, 2010, http://communities.aia.org/sites/hdoaa/wiki/Wiki%20Pages/ahd1018378.aspx

2. American Institute of Architects, comp., American Architects Directory First Ed. (New York: R. R. Bowker Co., 1956), 229, accessed March 3, 2010, http://communities.aia.org/sites/hdoaa/wiki/Wiki%20Pages/1956%20American%20Architects%20Directory.aspx

3. American Institute of Architects, comp., American Architects Directory Second Ed. (New York: R. R. Bowker Co., 1962), 288, accessed April 4, 2010, http://communities.aia.org/sites/hdoaa/wiki/Wiki%20Pages/1962%20American%20Architects%20Directory.aspx

4. American Institute of Architects, comp., American Architects Directory Third Ed. (New York: R. R. Bowker Co., 1970), 377, accessed April 4, 2010, http://communities.aia.org/sites/hdoaa/wiki/Wiki%20Pages/1970%20American%20Architects%20Directory.aspx

Page Citation

D. Murphy, “Craig A. Harmon (1911-1976), Architect,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, December 18, 2014. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, March 28, 2020.


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