Steele, Weinstein & Associates, Architects

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Omaha, Nebraska, 1963-1969


Partners:

William LaBarthe Steele, Jr., Omaha, Nebraska

Alex Weinstein, Omaha, Nebraska


Steele, Weinstein & Associates was organized in 1963.[1]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Omaha, Nebraska, 1964-1969

Lineage of the Firm

1891-1893: Walker, Kimball & Best, Architects, Omaha, Nebraska, and Boston, Massachusetts.

1892-1899: Walker & Kimball, Architects, Omaha, Nebraska, and Boston, Massachusetts.

1900-1928: Thomas Rogers Kimball, Architect, Omaha, Nebraska.

1928-1945: Kimball, Steele & Sandham, Architects, Omaha, Nebraska.

1946-1956: Steele, Sandham & Steele, Architects, Omaha, Nebraska.

1957-1963: Steele, Sandham & Weinstein Company, Architects, Omaha, Nebraska.

1963-1969: Steele, Weinstein & Associates, Architects, Omaha, Nebraska.

1970-1971: Steele & Associates, Architects, Omaha, Nebraska.

Other Associations

1958-1959, 1968-1969: employed Charles H. Morton, draftsman (1958-1959) and associate (1968-1969).

1964-1971: employed Kenneth E. Nelson, associate.

1965-1968: employed Neil Astle as an architect.

Buildings & Projects

DM201304 424 11w.jpg
Karen Western Elementary School (b. 1964)
DM201304 220 11w.jpg
All Saints Episcopal Church (n.d.)
DM201305 200 11w.jpg
Mockingbird Elementary School (b. 1965)


Behlen Laboratory of Physics (1962-1965), University of Nebraska City Campus, Lincoln, Nebraska.[2][4][5:25][a]

Karen Western Elementary School (1964), Ralston, Nebraska. [3][d]

Mockingbird Elementary School (1965), Ralston, Nebraska.[3][5:163][c]

Learning Center for Hastings High School (n.d.), Hastings, Nebraska.[3][b]

Epworth Methodist Church (n.d.), Council Bluffs, Iowa.[3][d]

All Saints Episcopal Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[3][e]

Broadway Methodist Church Remodeling (n.d.), Council Bluffs, Iowa.[3][d]

Notes

a. Project commenced by the predecessor firm, Steele, Sandham & Weinstein Company, Architects, 1962.[2]

b. Steele, Weinstein & Associates were the architects; Charles H. Morton was the principal designer on these projects.[3]

c. Steele, Weinstein & Associates were the architects; Astle is thought to have been the principal designer.[4]

d. Steele, Weinstein & Associates were the architects; Astle and Charles H. Morton were principal designers while employed with the firm.[3]

e. Steele, Weinstein & Associates were the architects; Charles H. Morton was the principal designer and Astle "was also involved in the design development" while the two were employed with the firm.[3]

References

1. “Pioneer Omaha Architect Known Best by Buildings,” Omaha World-Herald (April 8, 1967), 19:3.

2. "Behlen Laboratory of Physics," in Kay Logan-Peters, An Architectural Tour of Historic UNL (Lincoln: University of Nebraska-Lincoln, UNL Libraries, 2005) Accessed March 23, 2017. http://historicbuildings.unl.edu/building.php?b=98

3. Neil Astle & Associates, Suite 414, Univac Building, Omaha, Nebraska, 68106, Architecture & Planning, 7100 West Center Road, Telephone 402 393 9788. (Omaha: Neil Astle & Associates, [ca. 1977]). [Individual project booklets and pages in folding box set]

4. Gordon Scholz, University of Nebraska, "Neil Astle at the college," email communications with D. Murphy, Nebraska State Historical Society, March 22-March 26, 2017. Scholz was one of Astle's students at Nebraska, and later worked for him at his Omaha office.

5. Steve Eveans, et al., New Architecture in Nebraska (American Society of Architects, Omaha, Nebraska: 1977).

Page Citation

D. Murphy, “Steele, Weinstein & Associates, Architects,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, March 17, 2015. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, May 26, 2020.


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