Difference between revisions of "Sidney Smith (1839-1915), Architect"

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'''AKA''': Sydney Thomas, Sidney Thomas, Sydney Smith, Henry James Thomas, Sidney Bolton [[#Notes|[h]]]
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'''AKA''': Sydney Thomas, Sidney Thomas, Sydney Smith, Henry James Thomas, H.J. Thomas, Sidney Bolton [[#Notes|[h]]]
  
 
'''Sidney Smith''' was born on February 1, 1839 to parents Lancelot & Hannah Smith in Norfolk, England.[[#References|[44]]] He spent seven years learning architecture and surveying as an apprentice, then he joined the Topographical Department of Royal Engineers, where he worked for a few short years before moving to New Zealand. While there, he worked in surveying townships and roads; he started the country's first railroad, Auckland & Drury, and he built the country's longest bridge, the Waiwakai Trestle Bridge. Smith also seems to have rendered some services for which the British government awarded him the English War Medal, as there was a war in New Zealand from 1861-1865. In 1867, Smith arrived back in England to begin working for the Military Engineering Department of the British Government, working his way up until, on December 10, 1869, he was appointed Clerk of Works. This afforded Smith the opportunity to work on many buildings of various types in England as well as Ireland. In 1874, he immigrated to Milwaukee, Wisconsin and continued practicing architecture there.[[#References|[1]]] '''Smith''' left Milwaukee for Omaha in August 1881, where he married his wife Sarah.[[#References|[1]]][[#Notes|[d]]] Smith did a lot of building in his limited time in Omaha, and was also elected President of the Western Association of Architects in 1888.[[#References|[36:1]]] However, after various conflicts with the legal system in Nebraska, Smith quickly left for Canada around 1892. While in Toronto, Smith married Effie Phoenix in 1893, and they had a daughter, Margaret.[[#References|[44][45]]][[#Notes|[h]]] The remainder of Smith's life, somewhat characterized by legal and societal conflicts, was expelled and forgotten from much of Omaha architectural history, though the impact of the neighborhoods and business blocks that Smith originated and built in Omaha is still easily felt by its current inhabitants and onlookers. Smith was incarcerated shortly in 1893 in Nebraska under charges of forgery and embezzlement. He moved to Chicago, Illinois after being pardoned from prison in Nebraska for designing a mansion and barracks for the state free of charge. Sidney spent some time in an asylum in Chicago, and he later died on March 12, 1915. [[#References|[44][46]]]
 
'''Sidney Smith''' was born on February 1, 1839 to parents Lancelot & Hannah Smith in Norfolk, England.[[#References|[44]]] He spent seven years learning architecture and surveying as an apprentice, then he joined the Topographical Department of Royal Engineers, where he worked for a few short years before moving to New Zealand. While there, he worked in surveying townships and roads; he started the country's first railroad, Auckland & Drury, and he built the country's longest bridge, the Waiwakai Trestle Bridge. Smith also seems to have rendered some services for which the British government awarded him the English War Medal, as there was a war in New Zealand from 1861-1865. In 1867, Smith arrived back in England to begin working for the Military Engineering Department of the British Government, working his way up until, on December 10, 1869, he was appointed Clerk of Works. This afforded Smith the opportunity to work on many buildings of various types in England as well as Ireland. In 1874, he immigrated to Milwaukee, Wisconsin and continued practicing architecture there.[[#References|[1]]] '''Smith''' left Milwaukee for Omaha in August 1881, where he married his wife Sarah.[[#References|[1]]][[#Notes|[d]]] Smith did a lot of building in his limited time in Omaha, and was also elected President of the Western Association of Architects in 1888.[[#References|[36:1]]] However, after various conflicts with the legal system in Nebraska, Smith quickly left for Canada around 1892. While in Toronto, Smith married Effie Phoenix in 1893, and they had a daughter, Margaret.[[#References|[44][45]]][[#Notes|[h]]] The remainder of Smith's life, somewhat characterized by legal and societal conflicts, was expelled and forgotten from much of Omaha architectural history, though the impact of the neighborhoods and business blocks that Smith originated and built in Omaha is still easily felt by its current inhabitants and onlookers. Smith was incarcerated shortly in 1893 in Nebraska under charges of forgery and embezzlement. He moved to Chicago, Illinois after being pardoned from prison in Nebraska for designing a mansion and barracks for the state free of charge. Sidney spent some time in an asylum in Chicago, and he later died on March 12, 1915. [[#References|[44][46]]]

Revision as of 13:48, 6 October 2017

SidneySmithPortrait1886.jpg
Sidney Smith, 1885.
Omaha, Nebraska, 1881-1893


AKA: Sydney Thomas, Sidney Thomas, Sydney Smith, Henry James Thomas, H.J. Thomas, Sidney Bolton [h]

Sidney Smith was born on February 1, 1839 to parents Lancelot & Hannah Smith in Norfolk, England.[44] He spent seven years learning architecture and surveying as an apprentice, then he joined the Topographical Department of Royal Engineers, where he worked for a few short years before moving to New Zealand. While there, he worked in surveying townships and roads; he started the country's first railroad, Auckland & Drury, and he built the country's longest bridge, the Waiwakai Trestle Bridge. Smith also seems to have rendered some services for which the British government awarded him the English War Medal, as there was a war in New Zealand from 1861-1865. In 1867, Smith arrived back in England to begin working for the Military Engineering Department of the British Government, working his way up until, on December 10, 1869, he was appointed Clerk of Works. This afforded Smith the opportunity to work on many buildings of various types in England as well as Ireland. In 1874, he immigrated to Milwaukee, Wisconsin and continued practicing architecture there.[1] Smith left Milwaukee for Omaha in August 1881, where he married his wife Sarah.[1][d] Smith did a lot of building in his limited time in Omaha, and was also elected President of the Western Association of Architects in 1888.[36:1] However, after various conflicts with the legal system in Nebraska, Smith quickly left for Canada around 1892. While in Toronto, Smith married Effie Phoenix in 1893, and they had a daughter, Margaret.[44][45][h] The remainder of Smith's life, somewhat characterized by legal and societal conflicts, was expelled and forgotten from much of Omaha architectural history, though the impact of the neighborhoods and business blocks that Smith originated and built in Omaha is still easily felt by its current inhabitants and onlookers. Smith was incarcerated shortly in 1893 in Nebraska under charges of forgery and embezzlement. He moved to Chicago, Illinois after being pardoned from prison in Nebraska for designing a mansion and barracks for the state free of charge. Sidney spent some time in an asylum in Chicago, and he later died on March 12, 1915. [44][46]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

OmIllus_FrankRes_1888_w.jpg
Elmer D. Frank House, b.1888 (Omaha Illustrated)

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Omaha, Nebraska, 1881, 1886-1889, 1890-1892, 1891, 1893

Educational & Professional Associations

ca. 1850-ca. 1857: apprentice of surveying and architecture, England.[1]

1857-____: Topographical Department of Royal Engineers, England.[1]

186_-1867: surveyor, New Zealand.[1]

1867-1869: Military Engineering Department, British Government, England.[1]

1869-____: Clerk of Works, Military Engineering Department, British Government, England.[1]

1874-1892: building superintendent, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.[1][3][d]

1881-1892: architect and superintendent, Omaha, Nebraska.[c]

1886-1888: board of directors, Western Association of Architects.[36:5]

1888: President, Western Association of Architects. [36:1]

1893: architect, Toronto, Canada. [44]

1893: inmate, State Penitentiary (several months, released in October), Omaha, Nebraska. [47]

1910: patient, The Chicago Home for Incurables, Illinois.[46]

Other Associations

1883-1884: employed Charles F. Beindorff as architect in charge.[6]

Buildings & Projects

Pre-1880

Auckland & Drury Railroad (1860s), New Zealand.[1][a]

Waiwakai Trestle Bridge (1860s), New Zealand.[1][b]

1880-1885

Judge Dundy House (1881-1887), 718 S 29th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [20] Demolished.

Mrs. Clarkson Tenement (1881-1888), 2005-2007 St. Mary’s St., Omaha, Nebraska. [20][34] Demolished.

Masonic Temple (1881-1887), Rapid City, South Dakota. [20] Demolished.

Saunders Block (1881-1888), 1218 Harvey St., Omaha, Nebraska. [20]

Pratt Block (1881-1888), Omaha, Nebraska. [20]

E.P. Birkheuser Block (1881-1888), Omaha, Nebraska. [20]

Davis Block (1881-1888), Omaha, Nebraska. [20]

Church at Shenandoah (1881-1888), Shenandoah, Iowa. [20]

Church at North Bend (1881-1888), North Bend, Nebraska. [20]

Church at Riverton (1881-1888), Riverton, Nebraska. [20]

Church at North Loup (1881-1888), North Loup, Nebraska. [20]

2 Houses (1881-1888), Park Ave., Omaha, Nebraska. [35]

Brown Block (1882), NE Corner of 14th & Farnam St., Omaha, Nebraska [20] Demolished.

Paxton Hotel (1882), 14th & Farnam St., Omaha, Nebraska.[1][10][11][e]

Hotel (1884), 11th & N St., Lincoln, Nebraska. [39] Demolished.

Plan (unbuilt) for Chamber of Commerce Building (1885), Omaha, Nebraska. [40]

Residence (1885), 1112 N 40th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [14]

Residence (1885), 4010 Nicholas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [14]

Residence (1885), 4012 Nicholas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [14]

Residence (1885), 4014 Nicholas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [14]

Residence (1885), 1117 Park Ave., Omaha, Nebraska. [15]

Residence (1885), 1121 Park Ave., Omaha, Nebraska. [15]

S.D. Mercer Mansion (1885), 914 Mercer Blvd., Omaha, Nebraska. [25]

Residence for J. T. Stuart (1885), 4130 Nicholas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [28]

Residence for John A. Wakefield (1885), 2613 Farnam St., Omaha, Nebraska. [31] Demolished.

Residence for J.M. Hurlburt (1885), 2104 Paul St., Omaha, Nebraska. [32] Demolished.

3-Story Block with Shops & Flats for C.A. Clowry (1885), 402-412 N 16th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [32] Demolished.

Residence for Dr. Jones (1885), 1922 California St., Omaha, Nebraska. [28] Demolished.

Herald Publishing Company Building (1885), Omaha, Nebraska. [31] Demolished.

3-story building for Mike Lee (1885), Omaha, Nebraska. [31]

Building for Alvin Sanders (1885), Omaha, Nebraska. [31]

Six 3-story Tenements for Milton T. Barlow (1885), Omaha, Nebraska. [31]

Eleven Dwellings for West Side Building Association (1885), Omaha, Nebraska. [31]

Ten Dwellings for Walnut Hill Building Association (1885), Omaha, Nebraska. [28]

3-story Residence for F.H. Creamer (1885), Omaha, Nebraska. [28]

Residential Block for W.H. Creamer (1885), Omaha, Nebraska. [28]

3-story Residence Mrs. W.C. Parrott (1885), Omaha, Nebraska. [28]

15 Dwellings for Walnut Hill Building Association (1885), Omaha, Nebraska. [28]

Block for E. Creamer (1885), Omaha, Nebraska. [32]

Tenement for William Parrott (1885), Omaha, Nebraska. [32]

E.P. Birkhewser Home (1885), 1102 S 32nd St., Omaha, Nebraska. [32]

1886-1890

3-story Shops and Flats for W. H. Creamer (1886), Omaha, Nebraska. [29]

5-story Hotel and Store for Burr & Wilson (1886), Omaha, Nebraska. [29]

Baptist Church (1886), Park Ave., Omaha, Nebraska. [29]

Residence for C.W. Pearce (1886), Omaha, Nebraska. [29]

12 Dwellings for West Side Building Association (1886), Omaha, Nebraska. [29]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 1337 N 31t St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 1341 S 31st St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4024 Nicholas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4102 Nicholas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4112 Nicholas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4116 Nicholas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4120 Nicholas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4124 Nicholas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4128 Nicholas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4201 Lafayette St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4207 Lafayette St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4211 Lafayette St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4215 Lafayette St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4031 Lafayette St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4019 Lafayette St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4023 Lafayette St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

Walnut Hill Building Association Home (approx. 1886), 4030 Nicholas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g]

H.L Cramer Block with Flats (1886), 15th & Chicago St., Omaha, Nebraska. [23] Demolished.

Presbyterian Church (1886), 29th & Mason, Omaha, Nebraska. [29] Demolished.

3-story Block with Stores & Flats for John Ledwich (1886), 16th & Howard St., Omaha, Nebraska. [23][33] Demolished.

Tenement for Dr. Graddy (1886), St. Mary’s & Nevada St., Omaha, Nebraska. [20][32] Demolished.

3-story building for John Ledwich (1886), Omaha, Nebraska. [31]

3-story Store & Flats for J.P Noonan (1887), Omaha, Nebraska. [24]

3 Dwellings for H.M. Lovette (1887), Omaha, Nebraska. [30]

Residence for L Bindford (1887), Omaha, Nebraska. [30]

Block of 7 Residences for J.C. Smith (1887), Omaha, Nebraska. [30]

6 Tenements for J.T. Hurtain (1887), Omaha, Nebraska. [30]

Two stores & flats for F.J. Fitzgerald (1887), Omaha, Nebraska. [30]

Plan (unbuilt) for Country Hospital (1887), Douglas County, Nebraska. [42]

James Lovett Tenement (1887), 517 S 21st St., Omaha, Nebraska. [20] Demolished.

W.H. Griffith House (1887), 220 S 29th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [21] Demolished.

Louis Bradford House (1887), 2026 Douglas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [21] Demolished.

Three-story Residence Block (1887), 29th & Pierce St., Omaha, Nebraska. [22] Demolished.

Three-story Store Building (1887), 27th & Hickory St., Omaha, Nebraska. [22] Demolished.

W.F. Clark Block (1887), 22ND & Douglas St., Omaha, Nebraska. [21] Demolished.

Smith Block at 16th & Woolworth Ave. (1887), Omaha, Nebraska. [4]

F. Nye House (1887), 1406 S. 10th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [30] Demolished.

30th & Woolworth Apartment Complex (1887), Omaha, Nebraska. [25][5] Demolished.

7 Houses for J.E. Smith (1887), Pacific St., Omaha, Nebraska. [21]

2 D.H. Wheeler Cottages (1887), Near Prospect Hill, Omaha, Nebraska. [21]

Manderson Block (1887), 602 N 16th, Omaha, Nebraska.[4:29][5] (DO09:0128-015)

Building (1887), 606-08 N. 16th St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0128-041)

House (1887), 2964 Woolworth Ave., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0204-125)

Building for S. Smith - LaMond Apartments (1887), 2603 Woolworth Ave., Omaha, Nebraska.[4:179][5] (DO09:0201-014)

Elmer D. Frank House (before 1888), 702 S 29th St., Omaha, Nebraska.[3][20] Demolished.

3-story flats and store for Mardis Bros (1888), Omaha, Nebraska. [36]

Tenement for James I Lovett (1888), Omaha, Nebraska. [36]

Plan (unbuilt) for Lake School (1888), Omaha, Nebraska. [41]

Residence (1888), 2705 Howard St., Omaha, Nebraska. [16]

Residence (1888), 2707 Howard St., Omaha, Nebraska. [16]

Residence (1888), 1733 N 19th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [19] Demolished.

Residence (1888), 1735 N 19th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [19] Demolished.

Residence (1888), 1813 Ohio St., Omaha, Nebraska. [19] Demolished.

Residence (1888), 2703 Howard St., Omaha, Nebraska. [16] Demolished.

Residence (1889), 560 S 27th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [16] Demolished.

Residence (1889), 562 S 27th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [16] Demolished.

6-Story Block for Harris & Fisher (1889), 18th & Nicholas, Omaha, Nebraska. [25][30] Demolished.

Residence for A.B. Wilcox (1889), Yankton, South Dakota. [37]

Queen Anne House for C. Williams (1889), 3006 Pacific St., Omaha, Nebraska. [f]

Additions on Charles F. Manderson Block (1889), 602-608 N 16th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [25][36] Demolished.

Plan (unbuilt) for Omaha City Hall (1889), Omaha, Nebraska.

Post-1890

House for Charles Poor (approx. 1890), 1337 S 31st St., Omaha, Nebraska. [g] Demolished.

Residence for Michael Lee (1890), 3060 Woolworth Ave., Omaha, Nebraska. [4][12] (DO09:0204-119)

Residence (1890), 3061 Woolworth Ave., Omaha, Nebraska. [4][12]

Building for S. Smith (1890), 3062 Woolworth Ave., Omaha, Nebraska.[4:180][5] (DO09:0204-118)

Residence (1890), 1033 S 20th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [17] Demolished.

Residence (1890), 1035 S 20th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [17] Demolished.

Residence (1890), 2114 Locust St., Omaha, Nebraska. [18] Demolished.

Residence (1890), 2116 Locust St., Omaha, Nebraska. [18] Demolished.

Residence (1890), 1037 S 20th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [17] Demolished.

Beaverhead County Courthouse (1890), 2 S Pacific St., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. [24][27]

Yankton National Bank (1890) 332 Broadway St., Yankton, South Dakota. [24][27]

Yankton Office Building for J.T. Pierce & Co. (1890), Yankton, South Dakota. [24][27]

Park County Courthouse (1890), Livingston, Montana. [27][24] Demolished.

George Bogart Residence (1890), Shenandoah, Iowa. [24][27] Demolished.

Jarvis Richards Residence (1890), 411 Chadron Ave., Chadron, Nebraska. [24][27] Demolished.

Hall & Store for E.J. Engelman (1891), Coin, Iowa. [38]

Residence (1891), 1039 S 20th St., Omaha, Nebraska. [17]

Plan (unbuilt) for State Fair Building (1892), Lancaster County, Nebraska. [43]

Thomas Jefferson Majors Farmhouse (1893), 800 Mulberry St., Peru, Nebraska. [13]

Plan (unbuilt) for Wayne County Courthouse (1899), Wayne, Nebraska.

Building (1907), 3204 N. 16th Street, Omaha, Nebraska.[5]

Honors & Awards

English War Medal (for services during the war in New Zealand between 1861 and 1865).[3]

Notes

a. Purportedly the first railroad in New Zealand.[1]

b. Purportedly the longest bridge in New Zealand.[1]

c. The Business Sections of the Omaha City Directory gives the dates, 1881-1892.[9]

d. Reference [3] is in contrast to reference [1], stating that Smith worked in Milwaukee until 1892, but was doing work in Omaha at the same time. Sources including reference [1] and the Omaha City Directory [9] state that he actually came to Omaha in 1881.

e. The reference for this building was published in 1882. It states that Smith's first work in Omaha was as superintendent of the building of the Grand Central Hotel. However, the Grand Central Hotel opened in 1873 and burned down in 1878. It is well to assume that the reference was actually to the Paxton Hotel, built on the very same site in 1882, and the change of name was simply not known when the text went to the publisher. The architects were Eckel & Mann, Architects.[1][10][11]

f. Sidney Smith was the Supervising Architect for this building.

g. Though without confirming documentation, these buildings have been reasonably assumed to be Sidney Smith’s work by contributor Quentin Lueninghoener. These assumptions are based on observations of particular “Smith” designs being replicated in the specific Omaha neighborhoods north of Hanscom Park, as well as the Walnut Hill neighborhood, which he is said to have originated. It is also understood that Smith owned a lot of land, and did a lot of his building in this area.

h. Sidney Smith went by the name "Sydney Thomas" on the birth record of his daughter Margaret, who was born in 1893.[48] He also went by the name "Henry James Thomas", the son of "Sydney Thomas", when he married Effie, the mother of Margaret.[45] He likely changed his identity to evade arrest in addition to the fact that he was still married to a woman in Nebraska.

References

1. A. T. Andreas, History of the State of Nebraska (Chicago: Western Historical Company, 1882), 798.

2. “Sidney Smith of Omaha Responds to a Toast of the British Institute of Architects” [at Chicago Convention of the A.I.A.] Omaha Excelsior (Dec. 13, 1884) (he states he joined the R.I.B.A. 17 years ago).

3. Omaha Morning World-Herald (April 13, 1892), 6:1. (copy in Nebraska State Historical Society file).

4. Landmarks, Inc., An Inventory of Historic Omaha Buildings (Omaha: Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission, 1980).

5. City of Omaha Planning Department, Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission, Database, Query on Architects, May 20, 2002; courtesy of Lynn Meyer, Preservation Planner.

6. "The Superintendant [Omaha’s New Post Office],” Omaha Excelsior (March 12, 1892), 4.

7. Application of John McDonald for Registration to Practice Professional Engineering and Architecture, Nebraska State Board of Examiners for Professional Engineers and Architects, December 30, 1937. Nebraska State Historical Society, RG081 SG2.

8. Industrial Chicago: The Building Interests Vol. 1 (Chicago: Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1891) accessed August 2, 2012, http://libsysdigi.library.uiuc.edu/oca/Books2008-03/industrialchicag/industrialchicag01good/industrialchicag01good.pdf

9. A Comprehensive Program for Historic Preservation in Omaha (Omaha: Omaha City Planning Department, 1980), 92-93 [Omaha Directories, Business Section listings].

10. Wikipedia contributors, "Grand Central Hotel (Omaha, Nebraska)," Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Grand_Central_Hotel_(Omaha,_Nebraska)&oldid=734501869 (accessed February 7, 2017).

11. John Mitchell, "Grand Central Hotel," Early Omaha: Gateway to the West (2003), Accessed through Omaha Public Libraries on Febraury 7, 2017. http://digital.omahapubliclibrary.org/earlyomaha/buildings/grandcentral.html

12. Omaha Daily Bee (January 1, 1881).

13. Omaha World Herald (October 4, 1893).

14. Omaha Daily Bee (July 8, 1884).

15. Omaha Daily Bee (January 24, 1884).

16. Omaha Daily Bee (July 25, 1889).

17. Omaha Daily Bee (December 11, 1890).

18. Omaha Daily Bee (July 3, 1890).

19. Omaha Daily Bee (May 25, 1888).

20. Omaha World Herald (January 1, 1888)

21. Omaha World Herald (March 11, 1887).

22. Omaha World Herald (February 2, 1887).

23. Omaha Daily Bee (February 11, 1886)

24. The Inland Architect & News Record Vol. 8 No. 8 (Chicago: 1889).

25. The Building Budget Vol. 4 (Chicago: 1888).

26. The Building Budget Vol. 5 (Chicago: 1889).

27. The Building Budget Vol. 6 (Chicago: 1890).

28. The Inland Architect & News Record Vol. 6 No. 2 (Chicago: 1885).

29. The Inland Architect & News Record Vol. 7 No. 5 (Chicago: 1886).

30. The Inland Architect & News Record Vol. 9 No. 4 (Chicago: 1887).

31. The Inland Architect & News Record Vol. 5 No. 4 (Chicago: 1885).

32. The Inland Architect & News Record Vol. 6 No. 3 (Chicago: 1885).

33. The Inland Architect & News Record Vol. 7 No. 4 (Chicago: 1886).

34. Omaha Daily Bee (June 17, 1886).

35. Omaha Daily Bee (December 31, 1883).

36. The Inland Architect & News Record Vol. 11 No. 1 (Chicago: 1888).

37. The Inland Architect & News Record Vol. 13 No. 7 (Chicago: 1889).

38. The Inland Architect & News Record Vol. 17 No. 3 (Chicago: 1891).

39. Omaha Daily Bee (January 23, 1884).

40. Omaha Daily Bee (September 28, 1885).

41. Omaha Daily Bee (February 21, 1888).

42. Omaha Daily Bee (August 16, 1887).

43. Omaha Daily Bee (January 20, 1892).

44. "Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994", database, FamilySearch (17 May 2016), Sidney Smith, 12 Mar 1915; citing , Cook, Illinois, United States, source reference cn18051, Record No.87, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,287,521.1-1-N741-79M. Accessed September 21, 2017 via https://www.familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N741-79M

45. “Schedule B-Marriages-Toronto, York County, Canada,” Canada Marriage Records, No. 014248 (Toronto, Canada: 1892).

46. 1910 Unites States Census, s.v. “Smith Sidney,” The Chicago Home for Incurables, Cook County, Illinois.

47. Omaha Daily Bee (October 5, 1893).

48. “Schedule A-Births-Toronto, York County, Canada,” Canada Birth Records, No. 011761 (Toronto, Canada: 1893).

Page Citation

Quentin Lueninghoener, “Sidney Smith (1839-1915), Architect,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, September 21, 2017. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, September 18, 2020.


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