Max Rudolph Nippell (ca. 1871-1941), Architect

From E Nebraska History
Jump to: navigation, search

Omaha, Nebraska, 1906-1913


Max Rudolph Nippell was born on October 26, 1871 in Neuchâtel, Switzerland. His parents were Jean-Pierre and Anna Lydia (née Batten) Nippell.[1][b] Nippell's father was an English teacher at a college in Neuchâtel, and his mother was later indicated, by Nippell, as English.[4] Nippell immigrated to the United States around 1905, and was employed as a draftsman in the office of John McDonald in Omaha. In 1907, he worked for Frederick W. Clarke. By 1911, he began the partnership of Nippell & Bellas, Architects with Charles Bellas. He married Grace Wilkins in 1907 in Omaha, with whom he had at least two children.[5] In about 1919, Nippell married Adella J. Edwards in Jackson County, Missouri.[6] After this, Nippell is found living in Dallas, Texas; Springfield, Massachusetts; Englewood, New Jersey; and San Diego, California.[7][8][9][10] Max Nippell died on November 21, 1941, in San Diego.[10]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Omaha, Nebraska, 1907-1911, 1913

Educational & Professional Associations

1905-1906: draftsman, John McDonald, Omaha, Nebraska.[a]

1907: architect, F. W. Clarke, Omaha, Nebraska.

1908-1909: architect, 806 New York Life Building, Omaha, Nebraska.

1910: architect, 429 Paxton Block, Omaha, Nebraska.

1911-1913: architect and partner, Nippell & Bellas, Architects, Omaha, Nebraska.

1913: architect and partner with Fred Petersen, Architect, Omaha, Nebraska.[11]

1915-1917: architect, Fort Dodge, Iowa.[12][13][14][15][16]

1920: residing in Dallas, Texas.[7]

1926: architect, Springfield, Massachusetts.[8]

1930: architect, Englewood, New Jersey.[9]

1941: residing in San Diego, California.[10]

Buildings & Projects

Bungalow for Mrs. L Strow (1917), Olsen Park, Fort Dodge, Iowa.[12]

Bungalow for W. C. Halsey (1917), Eagle Grove, Iowa.[12]

Garage for Ft. Dodge Auto Company (1917), 12th St., & 1st Ave., Fort Dodge, Iowa.[13]

Residence and Garage for W.G. Moore (1917), east end, Fort Dodge, Iowa.[14]

Notes

a. First Omaha directory listing, 1905.

b. Some sources give his birth date as either November 22, 1872 or 1873, but all corroborate his parents' names.[2][3]

References

1. “Naissances,” Feuille D'Avis de Neuchatel (November 4, 1871), 6.

2. U.S. Social Security Administration, Applications & Claims, 1935-2007 (n.d.) Accessed August 26, 2016 through Ancestry.com

3. State of California, Death Index: 1940-1997 (n.d.) Accessed August 26, 2016 through Ancestry.com

4. Annuaire Officiel de la Republique et Canton de Neuchatel, (La Chaux-de-Fonds: Imprimerie duNational Suisse, 1895). Accessed through Google Books on August 26, 2016.

5. Greater Omaha Geneological Society, Omaha Area Marriages: N-Nm (n.d.) Accessed August 27, 2016. https://omahamarriages.wordpress.com/

6. State of Missouri, Marriage Records: 1805-2002,(n.d.). Accessed August 27, 2016 through Ancestry.com.

7. 1920 United States Census, s.v. "Max Nippell" Dallas, Texas. Accessed through Ancestry.com.

8. Architecture, vol. 53 (1926), 144. Accessed on August 27, 2016 through Google Books.

9. 1930 United States Census, s.v. "Max Nippell", Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed through Ancestry.com

10. State of California, Death Index: 1940-1997, (n.d.). Accessed August 26, 2016 through Ancestry.com

11. Omaha World Herald (April 27, 1913), 3. (advertisement)

12. “Ft. Dodge, IA,” The American Contractor Vol. 38, No. 25 (June 23, 1917), 64. Accessed through Google Books. https://books.google.com/books?id=fDRYAAAAYAAJ&dq=Max%20Nippell&pg=RA11-PA64#v=onepage&q=Max%20Nippell&f=false

13. “Ft. Dodge, IA,” The American Contractor Vol. 38, No. 21 (May 26, 1917), 69. Accessed through Google Books. https://books.google.com/books?id=fDRYAAAAYAAJ&dq=Max%20Nippell&pg=RA7-PA69#v=onepage&q=Max%20Nippell&f=false

14. “Ft. Dodge, IA,” The American Contractor Vol. 38, No. 17 (April 28, 1917), 78. Accessed through Google Books. https://books.google.com/books?id=fDRYAAAAYAAJ&dq=Max%20Nippell&pg=RA3-PA78#v=onepage&q=Max%20Nippell&f=false

15. “Garages,” The American Contractor Vol. 38, No. 21 (May 26, 1917), 31. Accessed through Google Books. https://books.google.com/books?id=fDRYAAAAYAAJ&dq=Max%20Nippell&pg=RA7-PA31#v=onepage&q=Max%20Nippell&f=false

16. “Fort Dodge, Iowa," and “Fort Dodge, Iowa, Webster County,” The Construction News Vol 40, No. 21 (November 27, 1915), 13. Accessed through Google Books. https://books.google.com/books?id=oOBaAAAAYAAJ&lpg=RA1-PA112&ots=RMwRgrog5Y&dq=Max%20Nippell%20Fort%20Dodge%2C%20Iowa&pg=RA1-PA112#v=onepage&q=Max%20Nippell%20Fort%20Dodge,%20Iowa&f=false


Return to Top of Page

Acknowledgements

Patrick Thompson and the editors wish to acknowledge the support of Restoration Exchange Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska.

Page Citation

Patrick Thompson, “Max Rudolph Nippell (ca. 1871-1941), Architect,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, September 16, 2016. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, October 31, 2020.


Contact the Nebraska State Historic Preservation Office with questions or comments concerning this page, including any problems you may have with broken links (see, however, the Disclaimers link at the bottom of this page). Please provide the URL to this page with your inquiry.