Louis Adolphe Simon (1867-1958), Architect

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Washington, D.C.


Louis Adolphe Simon was born in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1894, Simon opened a private practice in Baltimore, which he operated until 1896, when he was appointed to the Office of Supervising Architect at the U.S. Treasury Department. Simon served as Chief of the Architecture Division, from 1905-1933, and Supervising Architect, from 1933-1941. In this capacity, he directed the designs for post offices, courthouses, customs houses, mints, assay offices, hospitals, and federal office buildings. Simon retired in 1944.

Simon was a Member and Fellow of the Association of Federal Architects, and he was an AIA Member Emeritus in the Washington-Metro Chapter. He also was affiliated with the National Institute of Arts & Letters, All Souls Church, the Cosmos Club, the American Planning and Civic Association, and the Committee of 100 on the Federal City. In his personal life, Simon was married and had 3 children. His foreign travel included primarily: England, France, Italy, Germany, Austria, Netherlands, and Switzerland.[3] Simon died May 11, 1958.[2]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Educational & Professional Associations

____: student, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.[5]

____: study travel in Europe.[3][5]

1894-1896: architect, Baltimore, Maryland. .[3][5]

1896-1915: architect, Supervising Architect of the U. S. Treasury.[5]

1915-1934: chief, Engineering and Drafting Division, Supervising Architect of the U. S. Treasury.[5]

1934-1940: supervising architect, U. S. Treasury.[3][5]

1942: retired, reappointed.[3]

1944: retired.[3]

Architectural Study Travel

England, France, Italy, Germany, Austria, Netherlands, and Switzerland.[3]

Buildings & Projects

U.S. Post Office (1934), 120 Pearl St., Wayne, Nebraska.[1] (WY05-053) National Register narrative

U.S. Post Office (1934-1935), 214 E. 4th St., Superior, Nebraska.[1] (NU13-003)

U.S. Post Office (ca. 1935), 411 Fourth St., David City, Nebraska. (BU05-066)

U.S. Post Office (ca. 1935), 203 E. 6th, Lexington, Nebraska. (DS07-052)

U.S. Post Office (1936), Eastside N. Main between 3rd & 4th , Valentine, Nebraska.[1] (CE14-090) National Register narrative

U,S. Post Office (1936-1937), 410 N. Minden, Minden, Nebraska.[1] (KN04-007) National Register narrative

U.S. Post Office (1936-1937), NW corner 4th & Clay, O’Neill, Nebraska.[1] (HT13-131) National Register narrative

U.S. Post Office (1936-1937), 1320 Courthouse Ave., Auburn, Nebraska.[1] (NH01-056) National Register narrative

U. S. Post Office (1936-1939), Seward, Nebraska.[4][a] (SW09-166)

U.S. Post Office (1937), 310 W. Church St., Albion, Nebraska.[1] (BO02-004) National Register narrative

U.S. Post Office (1937), SW corner Olive & 5th, Hebron, Nebraska.[1] (TY10-008) National Register narrative

U.S. Post Office (1937-1938), Eastside Spruce bet E 3rd &, Ogallala, Nebraska.[1] (KH04-080) National Register narrative

U.S. Post Office (1938), 144 Main, Crawford, Nebraska.[1] (DW04-007) National Register narrative

U.S. Post Office (1939), 300 N. Webster St., Red Cloud, Nebraska.[1] (WT07-195) National Register narrative

U.S. Post Office (1939-1940), 202 N. 9th, Geneva, Nebraska.[1] (FM05-126) National Register narrative

U.S. Post Office (1940), 119 E. 11th, Schuyler, Nebraska.[1] (CX06-076) National Register narrative

U.S. Post Office (1940-1941), 703 G, Pawnee City, Nebraska.[1] (PW06-117) National Register narrative

Notes

a. Simon was the supervising architect; Richard W. Grant was the architect.[4]

References

1. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

2. AIA Historical Directory of American Architects: A Resource Guide to Finding Information About Past Architects, accessed July20, 2010, http://communities.aia.org/sites/hdoaa/wiki/Wiki%20Pages/ahd1041185.aspx

3. American Institute of Architects, comp., American Architects Directory First Ed. (New York: R. R. Bowker Co., 1956), 507, accessed March 3, 2010, http://communities.aia.org/sites/hdoaa/wiki/Wiki%20Pages/1956%20American%20Architects%20Directory.aspx

4. Building cornerstone; recorded January, 2013. Nebraska State Historical Society, Historic Preservation Division, image: SW09-166_NSHSstaff-PHaynes_Jan2013_01.jpg

5. Walter E. Langsam and Alice Weston, Biographical Dictionary of Cincinnati Architects, 1788-1940, Architectural Foundation of Cincinnati website, accessed August 28, 2013, http://www.architecturecincy.org/programs/biographical-dictionary-of-cincinnati-architects/

Page Citation

D. Murphy, “Louis Adolphe Simon (1867-1958), Architect,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, March 16, 2015. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, June 3, 2020.


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