Difference between revisions of "Linus Burr Smith (1899-1982), Architect"

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<div style="white-space:nowrap;font-size:125%">'''Kansas; Lincoln, Nebraska, 1938-1976'''</div style="white-space:nowrap;font-size:125%">
 
<div style="white-space:nowrap;font-size:125%">'''Kansas; Lincoln, Nebraska, 1938-1976'''</div style="white-space:nowrap;font-size:125%">
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[[Image:Linusburrsmithportrait 2019 04 24 01w.jpg|thumb|right|alt=Linusburrsmithportrait 2019 04 24 01w.jpg|Linus Burr Smith, 1982]]
  
  
 
'''Linus Burr Smith''' was born March 8, 1899 in Minneapolis, Kansas. His higher education consisted of a Bachelor of Architecture from Kansas State University and a Master of Architecture from Harvard University. Smith received the Eugene Dodd Medal from Harvard University, as well as the Fontainebleau scholarship. He traveled in Europe, North Africa, and the Near East. While in Kansas, Smith worked for some local firms while also being employed as an assistant lecturer at his alma mater. Smith then moved to Lincoln, where he worked for a couple firms before teaching exclusively. He spent nearly forty years being a professor at the University of Nebraska, including thirty years as Chairman of the School of Architecture.[[#References|[5]]] During his time at the University of Nebraska, the size of the Department of Architecture grew immensely from only a few students to over 250. In the year of his stepping down as Chairman, the University's 1964 Annual E Week was dedicated to him. University students and Nebraskan architects thanked Smith for his work at the University of Nebraska, where he was a researcher and planning consultant as well as a teacher and administrator, with plaques honoring the qualities of leadership and creativity in architecture.[[#References|[8][10][11][12][13]]] He was known as an "inspiring teacher" with an "awareness of the basic need of beauty in man’s physical and environment and the vital role of architecture in its development.”[[#References|[11][12][13]]] Governor Morrison called Smith “one of the great professors in the country and was as educator in the fullest sense of the word.”[[#References|[10]]]
 
'''Linus Burr Smith''' was born March 8, 1899 in Minneapolis, Kansas. His higher education consisted of a Bachelor of Architecture from Kansas State University and a Master of Architecture from Harvard University. Smith received the Eugene Dodd Medal from Harvard University, as well as the Fontainebleau scholarship. He traveled in Europe, North Africa, and the Near East. While in Kansas, Smith worked for some local firms while also being employed as an assistant lecturer at his alma mater. Smith then moved to Lincoln, where he worked for a couple firms before teaching exclusively. He spent nearly forty years being a professor at the University of Nebraska, including thirty years as Chairman of the School of Architecture.[[#References|[5]]] During his time at the University of Nebraska, the size of the Department of Architecture grew immensely from only a few students to over 250. In the year of his stepping down as Chairman, the University's 1964 Annual E Week was dedicated to him. University students and Nebraskan architects thanked Smith for his work at the University of Nebraska, where he was a researcher and planning consultant as well as a teacher and administrator, with plaques honoring the qualities of leadership and creativity in architecture.[[#References|[8][10][11][12][13]]] He was known as an "inspiring teacher" with an "awareness of the basic need of beauty in man’s physical and environment and the vital role of architecture in its development.”[[#References|[11][12][13]]] Governor Morrison called Smith “one of the great professors in the country and was as educator in the fullest sense of the word.”[[#References|[10]]]
  
'''Smith''' also boasted an impressive level of civic engagement and professional work outside of his career. He was an active member of the American Institute of Architects, serving from 1940-1942 as the president of the Nebraskan chapter. In 1942, he was Nebraska's delegate to the national meeting of the American Institute of Architects. He also participated in several AIA Commissions, including the AIA Commission of the National Capital (1935-1936), the AIA Commission on Arts & Crafts (1942), and the AIA Commission on Rural Practice (1944). Additionally, Smith served as director of the Nebraska Art Association for five years, he was a consultant for the Nebraska National Commission on Civilian Protections, and he was the president of the National Association for the Advancement of Architectural Education. On top of all this, he was a member of the Notary Club, the Commission on Humanities in American Institutions, and the Nebraskan Architects Association.[[#References|[8]]] One year, Smith presented an illustrated lecture on architecture styles during George Washington's life at the annual George Washington birthday banquet, at the Lincoln YMCA.[[#References|[9]]] Clearly, ''The Daily Nebraskan'' had ample reason for naming him an outstanding Nebraskan.[[#References|[10]]] Linus Burr Smith died on July 23, 1982.[[#References|[5]]]
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'''Smith''' also boasted an impressive level of civic engagement and professional work outside of his career. He was an active member of the American Institute of Architects, serving from 1940-1942 as the president of the Nebraskan chapter. In 1942, he was Nebraska's delegate to the national meeting of the American Institute of Architects. He also participated in several AIA Commissions, including the AIA Commission of the National Capital (1935-1936), the AIA Commission on Arts & Crafts (1942), and the AIA Commission on Rural Practice (1944). Additionally, Smith served as director of the Nebraska Art Association for five years, he was a consultant for the Nebraska National Commission on Civilian Protections, and he was the president of the National Association for the Advancement of Architectural Education. On top of all this, he was a member of the Notary Club, the Commission on Humanities in American Institutions, and the Nebraskan Architects Association.[[#References|[8]]] One year, Smith presented an illustrated lecture on architecture styles during George Washington's life at the annual George Washington birthday banquet at the Lincoln YMCA.[[#References|[9]]] Clearly ''The Daily Nebraskan'' had ample reason for naming him an "outstanding Nebraskan".[[#References|[10]]] Linus Burr Smith died on July 23, 1982.[[#References|[5]]]
  
  
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Eugene Dodd Medal, Harvard University.[[#References|[5]]]
 
Eugene Dodd Medal, Harvard University.[[#References|[5]]]
  
Outstanding Nebraska, ''The Daily Nebraskan''.[[#References|[10]]]
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Outstanding Nebraskan, ''The Daily Nebraskan''.[[#References|[10]]]
  
 
==Notes==
 
==Notes==

Revision as of 12:35, 24 April 2019

Kansas; Lincoln, Nebraska, 1938-1976


Linus Burr Smith was born March 8, 1899 in Minneapolis, Kansas. His higher education consisted of a Bachelor of Architecture from Kansas State University and a Master of Architecture from Harvard University. Smith received the Eugene Dodd Medal from Harvard University, as well as the Fontainebleau scholarship. He traveled in Europe, North Africa, and the Near East. While in Kansas, Smith worked for some local firms while also being employed as an assistant lecturer at his alma mater. Smith then moved to Lincoln, where he worked for a couple firms before teaching exclusively. He spent nearly forty years being a professor at the University of Nebraska, including thirty years as Chairman of the School of Architecture.[5] During his time at the University of Nebraska, the size of the Department of Architecture grew immensely from only a few students to over 250. In the year of his stepping down as Chairman, the University's 1964 Annual E Week was dedicated to him. University students and Nebraskan architects thanked Smith for his work at the University of Nebraska, where he was a researcher and planning consultant as well as a teacher and administrator, with plaques honoring the qualities of leadership and creativity in architecture.[8][10][11][12][13] He was known as an "inspiring teacher" with an "awareness of the basic need of beauty in man’s physical and environment and the vital role of architecture in its development.”[11][12][13] Governor Morrison called Smith “one of the great professors in the country and was as educator in the fullest sense of the word.”[10]

Smith also boasted an impressive level of civic engagement and professional work outside of his career. He was an active member of the American Institute of Architects, serving from 1940-1942 as the president of the Nebraskan chapter. In 1942, he was Nebraska's delegate to the national meeting of the American Institute of Architects. He also participated in several AIA Commissions, including the AIA Commission of the National Capital (1935-1936), the AIA Commission on Arts & Crafts (1942), and the AIA Commission on Rural Practice (1944). Additionally, Smith served as director of the Nebraska Art Association for five years, he was a consultant for the Nebraska National Commission on Civilian Protections, and he was the president of the National Association for the Advancement of Architectural Education. On top of all this, he was a member of the Notary Club, the Commission on Humanities in American Institutions, and the Nebraskan Architects Association.[8] One year, Smith presented an illustrated lecture on architecture styles during George Washington's life at the annual George Washington birthday banquet at the Lincoln YMCA.[9] Clearly The Daily Nebraskan had ample reason for naming him an "outstanding Nebraskan".[10] Linus Burr Smith died on July 23, 1982.[5]


This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Lincoln, Nebraska, 1938-1939, 1940-1949, 1950-1959, 1960-1969, 1970-1976

Educational & Professional Associations

____: Bachelor of Architecture, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas.[5]

____: Master of Architecture, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts.[5]

1922: Hulse & Company, Hutchinson, Kansas.[5]

1924-1934: Assistant Professor, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas.[5]

1928: Thos. W. Williamson, Topeka, Kansas.[5]

1934-1935: Davis & Wilson, Architects, Lincoln, Nebraska.[5]

____: Meginnis & Schaumberg, Architects, Lincoln, Nebraska.[5]

1934-1970: Professor of Architecture, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[5]

1934-1964: Chairman of the Department of Architecture, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[5][8]

Architectural Study Travel

Europe, North Africa, and the Near East.[5]

Buildings & Projects

Preliminary plans, Agronomy Building - Keim Hall (1949-1952), University of Nebraska, East Campus, Lincoln, Nebraska.[6][a] (LC13:E11-175)

Meat Laboratory - Loeffel Hall (1953-1954), University of Nebraska, East Campus, Lincoln, Nebraska.[14]

Preliminary plans, Administration Annex (1953-1958), University of Nebraska, City Campus, Lincoln, Nebraska.[7][b]

Honors & Awards

Fontainebleau Scholarship.[5]

Eugene Dodd Medal, Harvard University.[5]

Outstanding Nebraskan, The Daily Nebraskan.[10]

Notes

a. The architects of record were Steele, Sandham & Steele, Architects.[6]

b. The architects of record were Hazen & Robinson, Architects.[7]

References

1. “The Year ’67,” Prelim (student publication of the School of Architecture, University of Nebraska) 2:2 (Fall 1967), 12.

2. L.B.S., “Space,” TS. ([ca. 1967]).

3. [Smith, Linus Burr], “The ‘ISMS’,” TS. ([ca. 1967]).

4. [Smith, Linus Burr], “The Research into Space: Cubism,” TS. ([ca. 1967]).

5. The AIA Historical Directory of American Architects, s.v. “Linus Burr Smith," (ahd1041876), accessed March 3, 2010. http://public.aia.org/sites/hdoaa/wiki

6. Kay Logan-Peters, "Agronomy Building (Keim)," in An Architectural Tour of Historic UNL (Lincoln: University of Nebraska-Lincoln, UNL Libraries, 2005). Accessed May 8, 2017. http://historicbuildings.unl.edu/building.php?b=80

7. Kay Logan-Peters, "Administration Building (Canfield)," in An Architectural Tour of Historic UNL (Lincoln: University of Nebraska-Lincoln, UNL Libraries, 2005). Accessed May 8, 2017. http://historicbuildings.unl.edu/building.php?b=97

8. “Prof. Smith to attend architectural meetings,” Lincoln Journal Star (June 21, 1942), 3:1.

9. “Prof. Smith Speaks On Early Colonial Architecture Types,” Lincoln Star (February 26, 1936).

10. “Architect Smith Honored,” Lincoln Evening Journal (June 1, 1964), 12:8.

11. “Architects, Students Honor Linus Burr Smith,” Lincoln Journal Star (May 24, 1964), 3B:4.

12. “Architects Cite Smith,” incoln Evening Journal (May 2, 1964), 3:6.

13. “Prof. Smith Honored By Architecture Students,” Lincoln Star (May 2, 1964), 3:2.

14. Kay Logan-Peters, "Meat Laboratory (Loeffel)," in An Architectural Tour of Historic UNL (Lincoln: University of Nebraska-Lincoln, UNL Libraries, 2005). Accessed May 8, 2017. http://historicbuildings.unl.edu/building.php?b=102

Page Citation

D. Murphy, “Linus Burr Smith (1899-1982), Architect,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, May 8, 2017. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, April 1, 2020.


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