Lahr & Stangel, Architects

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Omaha, Nebraska, 1916, 1928-1941


Partners:

Matthew John Lahr

Carl P. Stangel[6]


Lahr & Stangel was an architectural firm in Omaha. It was in business for one year, then was on hiatus until it opened its doors again in 1928.

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Omaha, Nebraska, 1916, 1928-1941

Educational & Professional Associations

Buildings & Projects

Dated

Notre Dame Academy & Convent (1926, 1936, 195_), 3501 State, Omaha, Nebraska.[7][8] (DO09:0361-004) National Register narrative

St. Anthony’s Catholic Church (1927), Steinhauer, Nebraska.[4]

St. Theresa of Child Jesus Catholic Church and School (1927), 15th & Ogden, Omaha, Nebraska.[2][5]

Westphalia Grade and High School (1927), Westphalia, Iowa.[9][a]

Memorial Auditorium (1927-1929), Northwest Corner 8th & Corso, Nebraska City, Nebraska.[6][9][a] (OT06:A-044)

High School (1929), Panama, Iowa.[9][a]

Auditorium and Gymnasium (1929), Earling, Iowa.[9][a]

Auditorium (1929-1931), Father Flanagan’s Boy’s Home, Omaha, Nebraska.[9][a]

Gymnasium (1929-1931), Father Flanagan’s Boy’s Home, Omaha, Nebraska.[9][a]

Swimming Pool (1929-1931), Father Flanagan’s Boy’s Home, Omaha, Nebraska.[9][a]

Administration Offices (1929-1931), Father Flanagan’s Boy’s Home, Omaha, Nebraska.[9][a]

Trades Building (1929-1931), Father Flanagan’s Boy’s Home, Omaha, Nebraska.[9][a]

Faculty Building (1929-1931), Father Flanagan’s Boy’s Home, Omaha, Nebraska.[9][a]

Service Building (1929-1931), Father Flanagan’s Boy’s Home, Omaha, Nebraska.[9][a]

Sacred Heart Church (1932), Shelby, Nebraska.[9][a]

Holy Cross School (1936), Omaha, Nebraska.[9][a]

Notre Dame Academy addition (1936-1937), Omaha, Nebraska.[9][a]

Auditorium and Gymnasium (1937), Neola, Iowa.[9][a]

St. Stanislaus Catholic Church (1939), Duncan, Nebraska. (PT04-003)

Undated

Boy’s Town Administration Bldg, Omaha, Nebraska.[1]

Sacred Heart Church, Shelby, Nebraska.[3]

Notes

a. Designed and Supervised by Matthew J. Lahr on behalf of the firm.[9]

References

1. Omaha World-Herald (November 2, 1930), 2. (photo)

2. Omaha World-Herald (November 13, 1927). (architect’s drwg)

3. “Tower resembles that of the Nebraska State Capitol,” Omaha World Herald (November 30, 1930), photo-section.

4. The True Voice (June 17, 1927), 7. (photos, dedication)

5. The True Voice (October 28, 1927), 3. (sketch)

6. “Trip to vault turns up blueprint treasure,” Lincoln Journal Star (March 9, 2003), 1F.

7. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

8. City of Omaha Planning Department, Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission, Database, Query on Architects, May 20, 2002; courtesy of Lynn Meyer, Preservation Planner.

9. Application of Matthew J. Lahr for Registration to Practice Professional Engineering and Architecture, Nebraska State Board of Examiners for Professional Engineers and Architects, October 31, 1937. Nebraska State Historical Society RG081 SG2.

Page Citation

D. Murphy, “Lahr & Stangel, Architects,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, February 9, 2015. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, April 15, 2021.


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