Jesse Boaz Miller (1880-1968), Architect

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Lincoln, Nebraska, 1913-1961

Jesse Boaz Miller was born near Wahoo, Nebraska in 1880. He received his advanced education at Nebraska Wesleyan University (1903-1904), the University of Nebraska (1904-1905), and the University of Illinois (1906-1907). In 1907, upon his return from the University of Illinois, Miller was engaged as a draftsman with the firm, Fiske & Dieman, Architects, continuing to work for Fiske until 1913 when he became Fiske's junior partner as Fiske & Miller, Architects. The partnership was dissolved in 1914 and Miller began to practice independently. In May of 1924, Mr. Miller went into partnership with Fritz Craig. Miller died in 1968.[1]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

DM201704_005_11w.jpg
DeBrown House (1915) (D. Murphy)

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Lincoln, Nebraska, 1915-1918, 1920-1922, 1935-1961

Educational & Professional Associations

1938: Registered Professional Architect, Nebraska, A-14; January 25, 1938.[9]

1907-1910: draftsman, Fiske & Dieman, Architects

1910-1913: draftsman, F. C. Fiske, Architect, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1]

1913-1914: junior partner, Fiske & Miller, Architects, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][10]

1915-1923: architect, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1]

1924-1935: partner, Miller & Craig, Architects, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1]

1935-1961: architect, Lincoln, Nebraska. License expired December 31, 1961.[9]

Buildings & Projects

Miller House (1909), 3434 T St., Lincoln, Nebraska.[13][a] (LC13:E09-222)

1913-1914 (Lincoln, Nebraska)

Jesse B. Miller joined Fiske's practice as a draftsman in the spring of 1907, then became the junior partner in Fiske & Miller in March, 1913. The firm was dissolved "by mutual consent" in 1914 and Miller commenced an independent architectural practice in Lincoln. See Fiske & Miller, Architects for the projects of their partnership in 1913 and 1914.[1][10][14][b]

1914-1924

Following his association with F. C. Fiske, Miller commenced an independent architectural practice in Lincoln for a decade.

Seventh Day Baptist Church (1914), 312 South A Street, North Loup, Nebraska.[58]

Barker House (1914), 1250 S. 24th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[25]

Store building and post office for D. J. Weiss (1914), College View (now Lincoln), Nebraska.[60]

Apartment building for W. B. Shurtleff (1914), 12th & K Streets, Lincoln, Nebraska.[61]

Apollo apartments for Herbert C. Jennings (1914-1915), 730 South 11th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[15][59]

LaBelle apartments for H. C. Jennings (1915), 740 South 11th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[16]

Brick stores for Mrs. James Mooney (1915), 206 North 7th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[17][22] (LC13:C09-083)

Project for Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity House (1915), northwest corner of 16th & S Streets, Lincoln, Nebraska.[34][e]

House for Towne estate (1915), 320 S. 29th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[7][18] (LC13:E08-187)

E. F. Jenkins House (1915), 3214 R Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[19] (LC13:E09-378)

House in Franklin Heights (1915), Lincoln, Nebraska.[66]

John M. Alexander/Clark Mickey house (1915), 1915 D Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[2][20][21] (LC13:D07-471)

House for W. K. Hodkin (1915), O'Neill, Nebraska.[67]

Brick store for S. S. English (1915), 432 South 11th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[24] (LC13:C08-251

Duplex for Warren E. Jennings (1915), 1321 C Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[26]

Grace Grayville House (1915), 1019 L Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[27][68]

W.B. Shurtleff Apartments (1915), 1441 G Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[28] (LC13:D07-0145)

Garage for S. R. McKelvie (1915), 145 South 26th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[29]

Apartment for John Violet (1915), 1236 H Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[30] (LC13:C08-223)

Apartment building (5 units) for Harry Lansing (1915), 18th & K Streets, Lincoln, Nebraska.[69]

Apartments for Monarch Investment Co. (1915), 515-519 South 18th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[31]

Apartments for Monarch Investment Co. (1915), 509-513 South 18th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[32]

L. H. DeBrown house (1915), 1995 Ryons Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[33][62] (LC13:D05-122)

Project ("Postponed") for 4 story storage warehouse for Carter Transfer & Storage Company (1915), 8th & Q Streets, Lincoln, Nebraska.[63]

Project for residence for Olaf Berggren (1915), 35th & O Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[64]

Residence for Chas. N. Cadwalleder (1915), 2627 N Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[65]

Stores, with lodging rooms above, for Jennings and Lansing (1915-1916), 105-307 South 11th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[36][70]

Remodeling and addition of Sam D. McKelvie house (1915), 140 South 26th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[71]

E. B. Cowles House (1916), 1901 South 24th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[35] (LC13:D06-0121)

Brick house for Warren E. Jennings (1916), 1917 South 27th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[37]

T. E. Williams House (1916), 1210 B Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[38] (LC13:C07-731)

Kappa Alpha Theta sorority house (1916), 401 North 16th Street/1548 R Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[39]

Reed House (1916), 1245 S. 27th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[40] (LC13:D07-0722)

Steward Avery Motor Company (1916), 1120 P Street, Lincoln, Nebraska. (LC13:C09-119)

Jennings Brothers and Thompson Apartments (1916), 300 South 16th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[41] (LC13:D08-034)

Farmers State Bank (1916), Mason City, Nebraska.[75][79]

Lei Lau Farl Apartments (1916), 224-240 South 17th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][12]

Garage & salesroom for Frank DuTeil (1916-1917), 1116-1120 P Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[8][11][42]

Warren Jennings House (1916), 1917 S. 27th St., Lincoln, Nebraska. (LC13:D06-0272)

Apartment house for Edward J. Righter (1917), 719 South 16th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[43]

House and garage/barn for Edward J. Righter (1917), 1535 H Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[44]

Garage for National Security Investment Company (1917), 2401-2421 O Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[45]

Residence for National Security Investment Company (1917), 2615 Washington Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[46] (LC13:D06-0744)

Crowell Memorial Home addition (1917), Blair, Nebraska.[80][81][f]

Garage for Roberts Construction Company (1918), 1941 O Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[47]

Trinity Methodist Church Parsonage (1918), 1744 South 24th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[48] (LC13:D06-0125)

Additional story for "Auto School" for National Security Investment Company (1918), 2401-2421 O Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[49]

Residence for David Calhoun (1918), 2816 Sheridan Boulevard, Lincoln, Nebraska.[50][51]

R. D. Herzog-George Holmes house (1919), 2907 Sheridan Blvd, Lincoln.[2][84]

Remodeling a residence for O. O. Hager (1919), 1528 Q Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[86]

House for T. E. Williams (1919), 1220 D Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[52]

Apartments over stores for National Security Investment Company (1919), 1205-1211 M Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[53]

Lincoln Hide & Fur Company Warehouse (1919-1920), 335 North 8th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[8][22][54][c] (LC13:C09-066)

Project for Gunn-Douglas Milk Products Company warehouse and plant (1920), 810 South 24th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[82][83][g]

Lennox Apartments (1920), 1132 N Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][72]

Project for residence for A. W. Lane (1920), 2034 Sewell Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[82]

Harvey Rathbone house (1921), 3067 Stratford Ave, Lincoln.[2][85][h]

Epworth Methodist Church (1921), 2980 Holdrege, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][55][73]

Paul H. Holm house (1922), 1801 D Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[21] (LC13:D07-041)

Homer V. Martin house (1922), 1735 South 25th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[5] (LC13:D06-0149)

Will F. Hitchcock house (1922), 2733 Sheridan Blvd., Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][2][6][51] (LC13:E05-002) (winner of 1924 Lincoln House Beautiful contest) National Register narrative

First United Methodist Church (1923), 714 North Beech Street, Wahoo, Nebraska.[56]

East Lincoln Masonic Temple (1923) 2700 S Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][74] (LC13:E09-340)

Harry P. O’Hagan house (1924), 2239 Smith, Lincoln, Nebraska.[51][76] (LC13:D05-545)

George M. Robinson, Jr. House (1924), 2734 Rathbone Road, Lincoln, Nebraska.[51][77]

1924-1935

Miller entered into a partnership with Fritz Craig in 1924 as Miller & Craig, Architects, designing numerous residences and more fraternity and sorority houses near the University of Nebraska campus than any other firm. Their partnership continued until 1935. See Miller & Craig, Architects for the projects of their partnership.

1935-1961

Standard Brands, Inc./Martin-Day Co. Building (1935), 19th & Y, Lincoln, Nebraska.[8]

Skelly Oil Company Filling Station (1937), 2600 O Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[88] (LC13:D09-220)

Apartment (1937), 3200 Sheridan Boulevard, Lincoln, Nebraska.[51][57] (LC13:E04-29)

Safeway Grocery (1937), 2620 O Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[90] (LC13:D09-221)

Jesse B. Miller House (1937), 3600 Sumner Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[87]

Safeway Grocery (1937), 1320 Q Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[91] (LC13:C09-036)

First Church of the Nazarene (1940), now United Latvian Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3302 C Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[92]

John E. Dean House (1946), 3220 Sheridan Boulevard, Lincoln, Nebraska.[51][78]

Undated

R. D. Herzog house (n.d.), 2221 Sheridan, Lincoln, Nebraska.[8][i]

Notes

a. His own home, this is Miller's first known design project. J. B. Miller applied for the building permit for this house in March, 1909, identifying himself as both property owner and architect. According to Lincoln city directories, Miller and his family occupied the home from 1910 to 1922. In the early years of their residency, the directories identified Miller as a draftsman for F. C. Fiske; not until 1914 was their brief partnership as Fiske & Miller noted.

b. An entry on Jesse Boaz Miller in Who's Who in Lincoln of 1928 declares with considerable specificity that after serving as a draftsman in Fiske's office from the spring of 1907 until March 1913, Miller became the junior partner in Fiske & Miller until September 1, 1915, when he began an independent practice. However, Fiske published a notice in a Lincoln newspaper of September 7, 1914 that the "co-partnership" of Fiske & Miller "is here hereby dissolved by mutual consent." Furthermore, Fiske announced a new firm with Harry Meginnis in January 1915, supporting the more limited span of the Fiske & Miller association.[1][10][14]]

c. In 1919, Miller designed the first stage of construction--the lower three floors--of what became a six-story building in 1927, when Davis & Wilson, Architects added the upper stories for Hardy Furniture Company.

d. The City of Lincoln Building Permit and building permit application (both #6159) are in conflict as to the specific parcel involved, the latter saying Lot 4 of Block 217, Original Plat of Lincoln, and the former indicating Lot 3. Lot 4 contains a brick duplex and Lot 3 a frame house, so it seems likely an error on the application was corrected on the permit, and that "Miller" designed the brick building.[26]

e. The Sunday State Journal of March 28, 1915 includes a fine perspective drawing and lengthy description of Miller's "Plans...for the erection of a new Phi Kappa Psi house at Sixteenth and S streets." The building shown "follows somewhat after the style of the English (Elizabethan) renaissance," and both interior and exterior features are described. However, when building permit #7003 to house that chapter on that site was issued in 1917, a colonial revival design by A. H. Welch of Columbia, Missouri was erected rather than Miller's design. In the 1920s, Miller and his partner Fritz Craig designed about a dozen of the chapter houses in Greek Row Historic District.[34]

f. The website of Crowell Memorial Home lists among "Important Dates" that in 1919, "Carriage house north of Mansion renovated, adding additional space to the house. American Contractor described the project as "Crowell Memorial Home: $17,000, 3 sty. & bas. 32x72.[80][81]

g. American Contractor of November 13, 1920 noted J. B. Miller as the architect of a $250,000 proposed fireproof warehouse and cold storage plant for Gunn Douglas Milk Products Co., with the address listed as 810 S. 24th Street, but also noted "Bldg. postponed until spring." It does not appear that a dairy plant of that substantial cost was ever erected on the southeast corner of Randolph and 24th Streets, and the Lincoln Evening Journal by mid-1923 was carrying classified advertisements for the "Bankruptcy Sale" of Gunn-Douglas real estate in Lincoln.[82][83]

h. A Lincoln building permit (#8180) for a $4,000 frame house was issued for 3067 Stratford in 1919; another permit (#9490) was issued in 1921 for a $5,000 stucco house. Neither permit application lists an architect, but the stucco house currently at that address matches the photo accompanying the 1922 Lincoln Star publication of a "House Beautiful Contest" which includes a Miller & Craig advertisement claiming design credit for Harvey Rathbone's house at 3067 Stratford.[2][85]

i. 2221 Sheridan Blvd. was built in 1909 for Frank Spalding, from designs by F. C. Fiske, towards the end of the Fiske & Dieman partnership, when Miller was a draftsman in Fiske's office. Herzog lived in other substantial houses on Sheridan Blvd., but neither his, nor Miller's direct connection with 2221 Sheridan is clear. However, Tom Kaspar noted a connection in his inventory of the archives of Davis Fenton Stange Darling, Architects.[8]

References

1. Who's Who in Lincoln (1928), 157.

2. “Beautiful Homes Contest,” Lincoln Sunday Star (July 6, 1924), 8-9. Advertisement for Miller & Craig, "Successors to Jesse B. Miller, Architect," lists five houses in contest by partners.

3. Obituary, Lincoln Star (November 1, 1968), 23.

4. Lincoln Star (July 31, 1919).

5. Plans on file--Nebraska State Historical Society

6. City of Lincoln Building Permit 9900, issued April 18, 1922, estimated cost: $25,000.

7. Becky Martin, “Woods Park Neighborhood Walking Tour,” Preservation Association of Lincoln Newsletter 28:3 (Fall 2010), 4.

8. Thomas Lee Kaspar (1951-2017), Architect, comp. Inventory of architectural records in the archives of Davis Fenton Stange Darling, Architects, Lincoln, Nebraska. 1996. Nebraska State Historical Society, RG3748, Box 16.

9. “Professional license results for Jesse B. Miller,” State of Nebraska Board of Engineers and Architects website, accessed December 17, 2013, http://www.ea.ne.gov/search/search.php?page=details&lic=A14

10. "Miscellaneous" notice in Lincoln Daily News (September 7, 1914), 15, announcing dissolving of "co-partnership" of Fiske & Miller.

11. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6878, issued December 4, 1916, estimated cost: $18,000.

12. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6758, with associated application and drawings, issued September 9, 1916, estimated cost: $36,000.

13. City of Lincoln Building Permit 2933, issued March 18, 1909, estimated cost: $3,000. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

14. "New Firm" (announcement of partnership of Fiske & Meginnis), Lincoln Daily News (January 4, 1915), 2.

15. City of Lincoln Building Permit 5804, issued December 16, 1914, estimated cost: $16,800. Architect: Jesse Miller.

16. City of Lincoln Building Permit 5822, issued January 27, 1915, estimated cost: $16,800. Architect: J. Miller.

17. City of Lincoln Building Permit 5842, issued February 23, 1915, estimated cost: $5,800. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

18. City of Lincoln Building Permit 5904, issued April 5, 1915, estimated cost: $3,500. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

19. City of Lincoln Building Permit 5964, issued April 17, 1915, estimated cost: $2,500. Architect: J. B. Miller.

20. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6003, issued May 15, 1915, estimated cost: $4,200. Architect: Miller.

21. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places as a contributing property with the Mount Emerald and Capitol Additions Historic District. SEE National Register narrative

22. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places within the Lincoln Haymarket Historic District. See National Register narrative and National Register photos.

23. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places within the Greek Row Historic District. SEE National Register narrative

24. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6036, issued June 1, 1915, estimated cost: $3,500. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

25. City of Lincoln Building Permit 5801, issued December 3, 1914, estimated cost: $6,000. Architect: Miller.

26. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6154, issued August 7, 1915, estimated cost: $5,000. Architect: Miller.

27. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6211, issued September 1, 1915, estimated cost: $6,000. Architect: Jesse Miller.

28. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6245, issued September 2, 1915, estimated cost: $10,000. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

29. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6252, issued September 24, 1915, estimated cost: $800. Architect: Jesse E.[sic] Miller.

30. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6311, issued November 6, 1915, estimated cost: $8,000. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

31. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6367, issued December 20, 1915, estimated cost: $12,000. Architect: Jesse Miller.

32. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6368, issued December 20, 1915, estimated cost: $12,000. Architect: Jesse Miller.

33. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6372, issued December 27, 1915, estimated cost: $4,500. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

34. "Proposed Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity House.--Jesse B. Miller, Architect," (Lincoln, Nebraska) Sunday State Journal (March 28, 1915).

35. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6393, issued February 9, 1916, estimated cost: $4,500. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

36. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6396, issued February 14, 1916, estimated cost: $10,000. Architect: Miller.

37. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6473, issued March 29, 1916, estimated cost: $4,000. Architect: Miller.

38. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6537, issued May 1, 1916, estimated cost: $4,000. Architect: Jesse Miller.

39. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6664, issued June 30, 1916, estimated cost: $8,500 (on application), $7,000 (on permit). Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

40. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6669, issued July 6, 1916, estimated cost: $3,400. Architect: Jess B. Miller.

41. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6708, issued July 27, 1916, estimated cost: $30,000. Architect: Jesse Miller.

42. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6878, issued December 2, 1916, estimated cost: $18,000. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

43. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7171, issued August 3, 1917, estimated cost: $17,000. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

44. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7193, issued August 23, 1917, estimated cost: $5,000; and Permit 7221, issued September 14, 1917, estimated cost: $500 (for "Garage & Barn") . Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

45. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7289, issued December 3, 1917, estimated cost: $15,000. Architect: J. B. Miller.

46. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7291, issued December 4, 1917, estimated cost: $3,000. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

47. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7315, issued January 29, 1918, estimated cost: $5,000. Architect: Miller.

48. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7374, issued April 15, 1918, estimated cost: $7,000. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

49. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7484, issued June 11, 1918, estimated cost: $36,000. Architect: J. B. Miller.

50. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7606, issued September 30, 1918, estimated cost: $8,315. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

51. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places within the Boulevards Historic District. SEE National Register narrative

52. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7891, issued May 13, 1919, estimated cost: $7,500. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

53. City of Lincoln Building Permit 8078, issued August 2, 1919, estimated cost: $100,000. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

54. City of Lincoln Building Permit 8110, issued August 18, 1919, estimated cost: $80,000. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

55. "Epworth Methodist Church, Twenty-Ninth and Holdrege," with photograph and caption, Lincoln (Nebraska) State Journal (January 8, 1922).

56. Correspondence between Kathy Colwell and Rev. Marvin Neubauer, 1998, regarding J. B. Miller and Wahoo Methodist Church, copy at Lincoln Planning Dept.; see also "and Our Churches...," Wahoo's Century Round-up, 1870-1970, 28; and see also Saunders County History (Saunders County Historical Society: 1983).

57. City of Lincoln Building Permit 26108, issued May 4, 1937, estimated cost: $10,000.

58. American Contractor (September 26, 1914), 73. Church to seat 150, $10,000.

59. American Contractor (September 26, 1914), 73-74.

60. American Contractor (December 5, 1914), 81. Listed as 2 stories and basement, 26'x42', $5,000.

61. American Contractor (June 19, 1915), 97. Listed as 4 stories and basement, 67'x89', $30,000.

62. American Contractor (June 19, 1915), 97. Listed as one story and basement, 38'x62', $6,000.

63. American Contractor (May 1, 1915), 107. $80,000.

64. American Contractor (May 1, 1915), 107. Listed as 2 stories and basement, $2,000.

65. American Contractor (May 22, 1915), 85. Listed as 2 stories and basement, 38'x38', $6,000.

66. American Contractor (May 8, 1915), 82e. "Owner's name withheld." Listed as one story and basement, frame, 28'x32', $3,000.

67. American Contractor (July 31, 1915), 86. Listed as 1 1/2 stories, 38'x28', $4,000.

68. American Contractor (September 18, 1915), 80. Listed as 2 stories and basement, 36'x40', $7,000.

69. American Contractor (October 9, 1915), 72. Listed as 2 stories and basement, 36'x44', $10,000. Brick veneer and stone trim.

70. American Contractor (October 23, 1915), 68. Listed as 3 stories and basement, 23'x85', $20,000. Common & glazed brick & terra cotta, terra cotta cornice.

71. American Contractor (October 2, 1915), 95. Remodeling and addition to residence, $8,000.

72. City of Lincoln Building Permit 8411, issued March 15, 1920, estimated cost: $40,000. Architect: Jesse B. Miller. See also "Lincoln's New Apartment Hotel at 1132 N Street Is Latest Word in Design and Equipment," Lincoln (Nebraska) Star (March 21, 1920), 12; illustrated with perspective "Drawing by Jesse B. Miller, architect."

73. City of Lincoln Building Permit 9058, issued May 7, 1921, estimated cost: $24,700. Architect: Jesse B. Miller.

74. City of Lincoln Building Permit 11054, issued April 28, 1923, estimated cost: $37,165.

75. American Contractor (June 3, 1916), 109.

76. City of Lincoln Building Permit 12897, issued September 16, 1924, estimated cost: $450.

77. City of Lincoln Building Permit 12090, issued February 29, 1924, estimated cost: $10,000. Architect Jesse Miller.

78. City of Lincoln Building Permit 42726, issued June 6, 1946, estimated cost: $7,000.

79. William Levi Gaston, History of Custer County, Nebraska, (Lincoln, Nebraska: Western Publishing and Engraving Company, 1919), 213 (with illustration).

80. American Contractor (October 6, 1917), 77.

81. "History," Crowell Memorial Home, on-line at http://www.crowellhome.com/about/history/ Accessed April 24, 2017.

82. American Contractor (November 13, 1920), 59.

83. "Bankruptcy Sale," Lincoln (Nebraska) Evening Journal (July 10, 1923), 11.

84. City of Lincoln Building Permit 8040, issued July 15, 1919, estimated cost: $25,000.

85. City of Lincoln Building Permit 9490, issued November 5, 1921, estimated cost: $5,000.

86. City of Lincoln Building Permit 8039, issued July 15, 1919, estimated cost: $1,141.00, for remodeling a residence.

87. City of Lincoln Building Permit 26447, issued July 6, 1937, estimated cost: $2,800.

88. City of Lincoln Building Permit 25024, issued July 24, 1936, estimated cost: $6,000.

89. City of Lincoln Building Permit 26108, issued May 4, 1937, estimated cost: $10,000.

90. City of Lincoln Building Permit 26339, issued June 15, 1937, estimated cost: $12,000.

91. City of Lincoln Building Permit 26764, issued September 10, 1937, estimated cost: $14,000.

92. City of Lincoln Building Permit 32214, issued April 25, 1940, estimated cost: $17,851. With associated drawings.

Page Citation

E. F. Zimmer and D. Murphy, “Jesse Boaz Miller (1880-1968), Architect,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, May 13, 2019. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, December 10, 2019.


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