Jacob Maag (1881-1980), Stone-Carver

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Omaha, Nebraska, 1905-1961


Work in Progress

Jacob Maag was born 1881 in Switzerland and came to America in 1905, settling in Omaha. He learned his trade at Baden, the Art Academy at Milan, and in the Atlelier of sculptor Angelo Magnioni.[2] He worked as a sculptor and architectural stone carver in Omaha for over fifty years, producing works for many of the most prominent buildings there.[1] He was married to Frieda, with whom he had two daughters.[3][4][7]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Maag_1w.jpg
Jacob Maag, ca. 1921

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Omaha, Nebraska, 1906-1915, 1928

Educational & Professional Associations

1881: born, October 7, 1881, Neunkirch, Switzerland.[6][7]

____: apprentice stone-carver and sculptor, Baden, Switzerland.[6][7]

____: passed apprenticeship examinations, Aargau, Switzerland.[7]

____: corporal, Swiss Army.[7]

____: private student, Atelier of sculptor Angelo Magnioni, Varese, Italy.[6][7]

____: student, Academy of Fine Arts, Milan, Italy.[6][7]

____-ca. 1905: stone carver, Memorial Chapel of King Umberto I, Monza, Italy.[6][7][k]

1905: arrived in Omaha.[7]

1906: carver, Omaha, Nebraska.[a]

1907: carrier, A Scholl Co., Omaha, Nebraska.

1908-1909: sculptor, Omaha, Nebraska.

1910: stone carver, Omaha, Nebraska.

1911: unlisted, Omaha, Nebraska.

1912-1914: carver, A Scholl Co., Omaha, Nebraska.

1915: carver, Omaha, Nebraska.

1916-1927: No Directories.

1928-1930s: sculptor and partner, Gloe & Maag, Ornamental Plaster Works, Omaha, Nebraska.[7]

1930: architectural sculptor, Omaha, Nebraska.[5]

1940: stone carver, Omaha, Nebraska.[4]

1961: sculptor, Omaha, Nebraska.[j]

1980: Died, August 25, 1980, Albion, Michigan.[7]

Architectural Sculpture & Carvings

Carvings in Stone

Dated

Conservative Savings & Loan Building (1906), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] The architects were Fisher & Lawrie.[b]

Stone repairs (ca. 1919), Douglas County Courthouse, Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6][d] John Latenser & Sons would have been the architects when the repairs were made.

Technical High School (1921), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][2][6] The architects were Fred and Edwin Clarke.[2]

Undated

St. Philomena - St. Francis Cabrini (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6][1] Thomas R. Kimball was the architect.

Carving and all models for St. Cecelia's Cathedral (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6] Thomas R. Kimball was the architect.

Carvings, including the cornerstone, for St. Peter Catholic Church (n.d.).[1][6] John Latenser was the architect.

All Saints Episcopal Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] Thomas R. Kimball was the architect.

First Presbyterian Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] George Prinz was the architect.

Holy Name Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6] Edward Sessinghaus was the architect.

Temple Israel - St. John's Greek orthodox Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6] John Latenser was the architect.

Models for quarry carvings and bronze doors, St. Margaret Mary Catholic Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6] Leo A. Daly was the architect.

Holy Angels Catholic Church (ca. 1918), 4320 Fort St, Omaha, Nebraska.[6] Jacob Nachtigall was the architect. Demolished.

Bethany Presbyterian Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Wheeler Memorial Presbyterian Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6]

Pella Lutheran Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6]

Black walnut frame for mosaic Madonna and ornamental plaster for Blessed Sacrament Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6]

Twenty-one Renaissance panels for Metz House (n.d.), 37th & Dewey, Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6]

Stone mantle, and later, model for the Bishop's bronze chandelier, Rufus Lee House (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Lincoln General Hospital (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Y,M.C.A. Building (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6][c] Fisher & Lawrie were the architects.[b]

Scottish Rite Cathedral (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6] John Latenser was the architect.

Masonic Temple (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Stone repairs (N.D.), Omaha City Hall, Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

South Omaha Public Library (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] Thomas R. Kimball was the architect.

Regis Hotel (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Boston Store - J. L. Brandeis & Sons Building (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6] John Latenser was the architect.

U. S. National Bank (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Livestock Exchange National Bank (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6] George Prinz was the architect.

Packer's National Bank (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] Thomas R. Kimball was the architect.

Farm Credit Building (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

City National Bank of Council Bluffs (n.d.), Council Bluffs, Iowa.[6] Fisher & Lawrie were probably the architects.[b]

Webster-Sunderland Building (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] Fisher & Lawrie were the architects.[b]

Byrne-Hammer Building (n.d.), a Creighton Estate building, Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Thomas Kilpatrick & Company Building (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Farnam Building (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] George Prinz was the architect.

Fontenelle Hotel (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] Thomas R. Kimball was the architect.

North and South Wings (n.d.), Omaha Central High School, Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6] John Latenser was the architect.

"Older part" of Omaha South High School (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Castelar School (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] John Latenser was the architect.

Howard Kennedy School (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] Fisher & Lawrie were the architects.[b]

Edward Rosewater School (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] Clark & Clark were the architects.

Central Park School (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] John Latenser was the architect.

Vinton School (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] Clarke & Clarke were the architects.

Benson High School (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6]

"Newer part" of Lake School (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Fremont High School (n.d.), Fremont, Nebraska.[1][6]

Pediment for Administration Building (n.d.), State Normal School, Wayne, Nebraska.[6]

Two life-size figures for Pierre High School (n.d.), Pierre, South Dakota.[1][6]

Eppley Library (n.d.), Omaha University, Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Forty models of college seals for Memorial Stadium (n.d.), University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][6]

First Church of Christ Scientists (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1]

Quinn house (n.d.), 6300 Dodge, Omaha, Nebraska.[1]

Ornamental Plaster Work

Undated

Masonic Home (n.d.), Plattsmouth, Nebraska.[6] John Latenser was the architect.

Govenor's and Secretary of State's Offices (n.d.), Nebraska Capitol, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][6][7]

Union Station (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6][7]

Rialto Theatre (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Omaha City Auditorium (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Tenth floor Tea Room (n.d.), J. L. Brandeis & Sons Building, Omaha, Nebraska.[6] John Latenser was the architect.

Scottish Rite Cathedral (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] John Latenser was the architect.

Auditorium (n.d.), Technical High School, Omaha, Nebraska.[6] Clark & Clark were the architects.

Auditorium (n.d.), Omaha Central High School, Omaha, Nebraska.[6] John Latenser was the architect.

Foyer (n.d.), Children's Memorial Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

St. Peter's Catholic Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] John Latenser was the architect.

St. Cecelia's Cathedral (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6] Thomas R. Kimball was the architect.

Ornamental plaster and wood carving (n.d.), Blessed Sacrament Church, Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Northwestern Bell Telephone Building (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6][b]

St. Mary Magdalene's Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Carving and ornamental plaster (n.d.), Metz House, Omaha, Nebraska.[6] George Prinz was the architect.

Chieftain Hotel (n.d.), Council Bluffs, Iowa.[6]

Stuart Building and Stuart Theatre (n.d.), Lincoln, Nebraska.[6] Davis & Wilson were the architects.

Cornhusker Hotel (n.d.), Lincoln, Nebraska.[6]

All ornamental plaster (n.d.), Burlington Station, Omaha, Nebraska.[1][6]

All ornamental plaster (n.d.), Burlington Station, Lincoln, Nebraska.[6]

Union Pacific Station (n.d.), Green River, Wyoming.[6]

Miscellaneous Works

Undated

Limestone Mermaid (n.d.), Gourmet Restaurant - Mediterranian Restaurant, exterior, Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Crofoot Memorial Cross (n.d.), Forest Lawn Cemetery, Omaha, Nebraska.[6][e]

Ritchie Memorial Cross (n.d.), Forest Lawn Cemetery, Omaha, Nebraska.[6][f]

Stainless steel memorial plaque (n.d.), Booth Memorial Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Cast cement fireplace mantle (n.d.), E. S. James House, Omaha, Nebraska.[6][g]

Exterior eagle carving (n.d.), Turner Hall, Omaha, Nebraska.[6] Edward Sessinghaus was the architect.

Aluminum casts of the Stations and two altar mosaics (n.d.), Boys Town, Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Bucher Memorial (n.d.), Redlands, California.[6]

Model for bronze plaque (n.d.), Superintendent Jesse G. Arnold, Omaha Home for Boys, Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Numerous original hand-carved alabaster lamps for private individuals (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6][h]

Several stainless steel nameplates for private individuals (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[6][i]

Notes

a. First Omaha directory listing, 1906.

b. Maag specifically credits George Fisher, who may have been the lead architect for the firm.[6]

c. Maag states the Y.M.C.A. carvings were done by Maag & Stadler.[6]

d. Maag specifies that these repairs followed the riots of 1919.[6] See, for example, Michael L Lawson, “Omaha, a City in Ferment: Summer of 1919,” Nebraska History 58 (1977): 395-417; and Orville D Menard, “Lest We Forget: The Lynching of Will Brown, Omaha’s 1919 Race Riot,” Nebraska History 91 (2010): 152-165.

e. Maag describes the Crofoot stone as granite, carved in a Romanesque style.[6]

f. Maag describes the Ritchie cross, the east face of which he carved, as granite in a Celtic design; he also made the models for the plaques.[6]

g. In addition to the James mantle, Maag states he carved many other stone and marble mantles for private residences.[6]

h. Maag lists Frederick Bucholz, M. Malek, J. Kendrick, E. S. James, "and others" as clients for alabaster lamps.[6]

i. Maag lists "Bucholz, W. Dale Clark, and others."[6]

j. Last Omaha directory listing, 1961.

k. The memorial chapel, known as the Expiatory Chapel (finished, 1910), Monza, Italy, is the monument-chapel built to atone and commemorate the site of King Humbert I's murder, July 29, 1900. Count Giuseppe Sacconi (1854-1905) was the architect; his student, Guido Cirilli, finished the work. The bronze Pieta over the entrance is by sculptor, Lodovico Pogliaghi. It may be that work stopped for a time upon the death of the original architect in 1905, perhaps providing opportunity and incentive for Maag to emigrate at that time. For information on the chapel, see "Sacconi, Count Giuseppe," James Stevens Curl and Susan Wilson, The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture (Third Edition) (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015), 666. Accessed April 15, 2016 via Google Books: https://books.google.com/books?id=e-KrCQAAQBAJ&pg=PA666&lpg=PA666&dq=Chapel+of+King+Umberto+I,+Monza,+Italy&source=bl&ots=ipMlWBopWx&sig=yJeLTHIJYhoELvKsdXOWHXnCXl8&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi1u5STvIrMAhUG3WMKHbT2CAk4ChDoAQg-MAc#v=onepage&q=Chapel%20of%20King%20Umberto%20I%2C%20Monza%2C%20Italy&f=false ; and the Wikipedia entry, "Expiatory Chapel of Monza," Accessed April 15, 2016. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expiatory_Chapel_of_Monza

References

1. "Historic Facade to be Restored," Omaha World Herald (November 1, 1992), 3F.

2. "Craftsmen of America," Blueprints (Fall 1983), 4.

3. 1910 United States Census, s.v. “Jacob Maag,” Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, accessed through HeritageQuestOnline.com.

4. 1940 United States Census, s.v. “Jacob Maag,” Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, accessed through AncestryLibrary.com.

5. 1930 United States Census, s.v. “Jacob Maag,” Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, accessed through AncestryLibrary.com.

6. Jacob Maag, "Mallet and Chisel: A fifty Year Saga of Architectural Sculpture," (The "I Remember" Series, Interview No. 9) TS. (Omaha, Nebr.: The Greater Omaha Historical Society, September 14 and September 16, 1962); Omaha Public Library and Douglas County Historical Society collections.

7. "Well-known Sculptor With Fort Calhoun Ties, Dies in Michigan," Fort Calhoun Enterprise (September 4, 1980), from the Albion [Michigan] Evening Recorder. "Obituary Record, Jacob Maag, Died on 8/25/1980," (Washington County Genealogical Society, n.d.) Accessed April 9, 2016. http://www.newashcogs.org/obituary.asp?item=10924

Page Citation

D. Murphy, “Jacob Maag (1881-1980), Stone-Carver,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, April 9, 2015. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, May 31, 2020.


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