Howard B. Bailey (1863- ), Architect

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Kearney, Nebraska, 1893-1895


Howard B. Bailey was born in New York, May 1863, to William C. and Eliza J. Bailey. He went to school in Rochester, and to the University of Rochester, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree before attending two years of graduate school at Cornell.[1][2][5]

After Cornell, Bailey moved to Kearney, Nebraska, where he entered into partnership with George W. Frank, Jr., in the firm of Frank Bailey & Farmer, later, Frank & Bailey. After Frank’s departure, Bailey stayed on in Kearney, practicing architecture, until 1895. In 1896 he moved to Omaha and entered the construction business. By 1910 he was living in San Diego, working as a building contractor, residing with his mother Eliza and sister Florence.[6]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Kearney, Nebraska, 1893-1895

Educational & Professional Associations

1880-1883: B. A., University of Rochester, Rochester, New York.[2][5]

1886-1888: graduate student, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.[2]

1888-1891: architect and partner, Frank, Bailey & Farmer, Kearney, Nebraska.

1889-1891: architect and partner, Frank & Bailey, Kearney, Nebraska.[a]

1893-1895: architect, Kearney, Nebraska.

1896-1898: with Hydraulic Pressed Brick Company, Omaha, Nebraska.[2]

1899-1900: partner, Rowles & Bailey, general contractors, Omaha, Nebraska and Oklahoma City Oklahoma.[1][2]

1910: contractor, San Diego, California.[3][6]

Buildings & Projects

Bid for erection of a school for the St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Le Mars, Iowa.[7]

3-story brick block for H. C. Andrews (1889), Corner Central Avenue and 21st Street, Kearney, Nebraska.[8][b]

Notes

a. An 1889 bird’s eye view of Kearney lists Frank & Bailey as local architects.[4]

b. Reference [8] is courtesy of Catherine Cramer, architectural historian, Tucson, Arizona.

References

1. 1900 United States Census, s.v. “Howard Bailey,” Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, accessed through HeritageQuestOnline.com.

2. “The Alumni,” General Catalogue of the University of Rochester, 1850-1911 (Rochester, New York: The Universtiy of Rochester, 1911), 75, accessed through Google Books on July 16, 2013, http://books.google.com/books?id=6JNAAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA75&lpg=PA75&dq=%22howard+bailey%22+architect&source=bl&ots=MPYjIcT2dY&sig=ZWP8gb8RUmHT-ZQ212lpZERo4gI&hl=en&sa=X&ei=Pl3lUZ7cFcaayQHMnYGACQ&ved=0CEQQ6AEwBzgK#v=onepage&q=%22howard%20bailey%22%20architect&f=false

3. "Catalogue of the Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity" (New York: Delta Kappa Epsilon Council, 1910), 863, accessed through Google Books, July 16, 2013, http://books.google.com/books?id=gD04AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA863&lpg=PA863&dq=%22howard+bailey%22+architect&source=bl&ots=jgkzSUzTfO&sig=oTQSpevFUnuVn0yVoyL_PtK_8Tk&hl=en&sa=X&ei=Pl3lUZ7cFcaayQHMnYGACQ&ved=0CEEQ6AEwBjgK#v=onepage&q=%22howard%20bailey%22%20architect&f=false

4. Henry Wellge, “Kearney, Neb.,” [bird’s eye view] American Publishing Company, 1889, accessed through World Maps Online on July 16, 2013, http://www.worldmapsonline.com/historicalmaps/1W-NE-KE-1889.htm

5. 1880 United States Census, s.v. “Howard Bailey,” Rochester, Monroe County, New York, accessed through HeritageQuestOnline.com.

6. 1910 United States Census, s.v. “Howard Bailey,” San Diego, San Diego County, California, accessed through HeritageQuestOnline.com.

7. Improvement Bulletin Vol. 24 (Chapin Publishing: 1901), 16-17.

8. Architecture and Building: A Journal of Investment and Construction Vol. 10 (1889), 134. [b]

Page Citation

D. Murphy, “Howard B. Bailey (1863- ), Architect,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, July 16, 2013. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, August 20, 2019.


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