Fiske & Meginnis, Architects

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Lincoln, Nebraska, 1915-1924

Partners: Ferdinand Comstock Fiske (1856-1930), Architect

Harry Winfield Meginnis (1877-1943), Architect

The "New Firm" of Fiske & Meginnis was announced in January, 1915, but the association of F. C. Fiske and Harry Meginnis went back at least to the beginning of the century, when Meginnis became a draftsman in the Cedar Rapids office of Dieman & Fiske. Meginnis was born near and educated in Maquoketa, Iowa, where Fiske's family settled during his childhood and where Ferdinand attended high school. While Fiske was a generation older than Meginnis, it seems likely that their connection had its roots in Maquoketa. Fiske & Meginnis were highly prolific in their decade of partnership, designing many residences, several public schools, and large commercial buildings, many of which remain in Lincoln and the region.[13][c]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the Format and contents of Nebraska architect entries page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

DM201604_052_11W.jpg
Whittier Junior High School, 1921-1923 (D. Murphy)

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Lincoln, Nebraska, 1915-1918, 1920-1922, 1924

Lineage of the Firm

1888-1889: Fiske & Peters, Architects, Lincoln, Nebraska.

1900-1910: Dieman & Fiske, Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

1902-1904: Fiske, Dieman & Meginnis, Architects

1902-1910: Fiske & Dieman, Architects, Lincoln, Nebraska.

1913-1914: Fiske & Miller, Architects, Lincoln, Nebraska.

1915-1924: Fiske & Meginnis, Architects, Lincoln, Nebraska.

1925: Fiske, Meginnis & Schaumberg, Architects, Lincoln, Nebraska.

Buildings & Projects

Dated

House plans for Sunday State Journal (March-September, 1915).[86][f]

Two-story addition to Hardy's furniture store (1915), 1312-1316 O Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[14]

Business building for Drs. Smith & Johnson (1915), 1314-1320 O Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[53]

Remodeling business building for A. L. Shader (1915), 1439 O Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[49]

Plattsmouth Carnegie Library (1915-1916), 4th Street & Avenue A, Plattsmouth, Nebraska.[2][8][b] (CC14-077)

Duplex for Mrs. Cousins and Mrs. Hicks (1915), 1637 G Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[52]

Grant Watkins House (1915), 1930 B Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[3][50]

George & Hazel Abel House (1915), 2335 Sheridan Blvd., Lincoln, Nebraska.[19][20] (LC13:D05-465)

Southwick/Funk House (1915), 1601 A Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[21][46] (LC13:D06-0337)

House remodeling for F. J. Rehlaender (1915), 2217 A Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[47]

House remodeling for W. C. Wilson (1915), 1541 M Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[51]

House for Floyd and Alma Rawlings (1915), 2001 Sewell Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[48]

Business building for Drs. Smith and Johnson (1915), 1314-1320 O Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[53

Repairs and addition to First Congregational Church (1916), 13th and L Streets, Lincoln, Nebraska.[85][f]

German Congregational Ebenezer Church (1916), 801 B Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[93][g]

Apartment for Charles H. Shore (1916), 1315-1321 K Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[57]

Designed Bungalow, “Design No. 103.”[10]

Ornamental entrance gateway to Auld Pavilion (1916), Antelope Park, Lincoln, Nebraska.[15]

N. Z. Snell House (1916), 3318 Randolph Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[45][46]

Remodel business interior for L. A. Timme (1916), 139 S. 11th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[67]

Benton Dales House (1916), 1140 S. 20th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[66]

Charles Olson House (1916), 1405 S. 16th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[65][46]

T. C. Rewick House (1916), 1933 Harwood Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[62]

Sadie Bronson House (1916), 1936 Ryons Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[61]

Dr. Hohlen House (1916), 1970 Harwood Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[60]

Miss Narcissa Snell House (1916), 720 South 33rd Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[56]

Garage for C. B. Towne (1916), 1800 E Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[58]

Don L. Love house (1916), 1953 B Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[3][22][46] (LC13:D07-0596)

Meeker-Anderson House (1916), 1950 C Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[3][23][46] (LC13:D07-0507)

Remodeling for State Journal Company (1916), 900-912 P Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[59]

Warehouse for Carter Storage Company (1916), 301 North 8th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[64]

Repairing of store and office for Kate L. George and Hayden Hyatt (1916), 125-127 N. 11th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[63]

George R. Whitney (Whitney-Stephenson-Merritt) house (1916-1917), 1965 B St, Lincoln, Nebraska.[3][24][46] (LC13:D07-0061)

Remodeling for Thompson Hotel Co. (1916), southwest corner of 11th & P Streets, Lincoln, Nebraska.[54]

Arcadia Township Library (1916-1917), SW corner Bridge & Reynolds, Arcadia, Nebraska.[2][6] (VY01-074)

Blair Carnegie Library (1916), Blair, Nebraska.[2]

Loup City Carnegie Library (1916-1917), NE corner 7th & N, Loup City, Nebraska.[2] (SM04-079)

Ravenna Carnegie Library (1916-1918), 121 Seneca, Ravenna, Nebraska.[2] (BF11-012)

Commercial Garage (1916-1917), 1600-1612 O Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[55]

Garage for Gregory Estate (1917), 1230 L Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[73]

"Hi-Y House" for YMCA (1917), 541 S. 22nd Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[68]

David City Carnegie Library (1917-1918), 360 E Street, David City, Nebraska.[1] (BU05-057)

W. E. Hardy House (1917) at Calvert Place (Calvert & Sheridan), Lincoln, Nebraska.[79][80]

Emory C. Hardy House (1917) at Calvert Place (Calvert & Sheridan), Lincoln, Nebraska.[79][80]

Auld Public Library (1917-1918), 537 N. Webster Street, Red Cloud, Nebraska. (WT07-096) National Register narrative

Willard Elementary School (1918), 1245 S. Folsom Street, Lincoln, Nebraska. [12](LC13:B07-063)

Remodel of Capitol School (ca. 1918), 16th & G Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[25]

Remodel of Bryant School (1918), 18th & Q Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[26]

Remodel of Swallow-Alexander House (1918), 1848 C Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[3][27] (LC13:D07-049)

John R. Moyer House (1918), 1140 S. 20th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[3] (LC13:D07-0505)

H. J. Amen House (1918), 601 D Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[69]

"Art[ificial] Stone" garage for N. Z. Snell (1918), 3318 Randolph Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[71]

Remodeling house for Mrs. May Jansen (1918), 2509 N Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[70]

Frank E. & Emma A. Gillen House (1918-1919), 2245 A Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[28] (LC13:D06-0714) National Register narrative

Remodeling cafe for R. E. Moore (1919), 1329 O Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[74]

Hartley Elementary School (1919), 33rd & Vine Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[29] (LC134:E09-044)

Handball court for YMCA (1919), 1304 P Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[72]

Top floor addition to Lincoln Drug Company (Apothecary) (1919), 8th & P Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[30][43]

Remodeling house for Charles Stuart (1919), 1830 E Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[75]

Warehouse for Lincoln Paint & Color Company (1919), 815 M Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[76]

Garage for S. Coniglio (1919), 1328 P Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[77]

Garage for Board of Education (1919), 225 S. 16th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[78]

Richardson County State Bank & Masonic Temple (1919), Stone Street, Falls City, Nebraska.[84]

Prescott Elementary School (1920), 2024 S. 20th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[4][31] (LC13:D06-0003)

Dr. Slattery House (1921), 4900 N. 14th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[16]

Edwin H. Steckley House (1921), 1946 D Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[3][32] (LC13:D07-0267)

Tobin House (1921), 2975 S. 24th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[19][44]

Dorgan House (1921), 2710 Woodscrest, Lincoln, Nebraska.[19][33] (LC13:D05-499)

Elliot Elementary School (1921), 225 S. 25th, Lincoln, Nebraska.[34] (LC13:D08-406)

Municipal Lighting and Water Works Plant (1921-1922), 2901 A Street, Lincoln, Nebraska. National Register narrative

Evans Laundry Dye & Carpet Building (ca. 1921), 333-335 N. 12th, Lincoln. (LC13:C09-042)

Whittier Junior High School (1921-1923), 2240 Vine Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[5][7][35][a] (LC13:D10-099)

Hebron Public Library (1921), Hebron, Nebraska.[2][81]

Lincoln Fixture Building (1922), 826 P Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[5][36][43]

N. H. Gardner House (1922), 2920 Sheridan Blvd., Lincoln, Nebraska.[19][89]

Lincoln Country Club House (1922-1923), 3200 S. 24th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[5][17]

Addition to Saratoga Elementary School (1922), 13th & Hudson Avenue, Lincoln, Nebraska.[5][37]

Dubois Public School (1922), Dubois, Nebraska. (PW03-035)

Lincoln High School Stadium (1923), 2229 J Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[5][38]

Junior/Senior High School (1923), East side J Street between 7th & 8th. Fairbury, Nebraska.[3][11] (JF04-469) National Register narrative

Modification of Wagner & Walt Store & apartments (1923), 901 S. 13th Street (at F Street), Lincoln, Nebraska.[18]

William & Maude Logan House (1923), 2430 Lake Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[19][90]

E. W. Sartor House (1923), 2943 Sheridan Blvd., Lincoln, Nebraska.[19][88]

Peterson Building (1923), 1209-1223 P Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[83]

Remodel of house for Arthur Dobson (1923), 3144 Sheridan Blvd., Lincoln, Nebraska.[19][39] (LC13:E4-39)

Gillen & Boney Building addition (1923), 201 N. 8th, Lincoln, Nebraska.[40][43] (LC13:C09-086)

Antelope Grocery (1924), 24th & J Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[11] (LC13:C07-896) National Register narrative

Smith-Cornell House addition (1924), 1910 S. 26th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[41]

Frank Gillen House (1924), 2141 Harrison Avenue, Lincoln, Nebraska.[19][91]

Dr. David Hinton House (1924), 2500 Woodscrest Avenue, Lincoln, Nebraska.[19][42]

F Street Fire Station (1924), near 13th and F Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[82][d]

Dr. Flansburg House (1924), 2301 Lake Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.[19][92]

Undated

Store for Mr. Fred Roos (n.d.), Waco, Nebraska.[9]

Notes

a. Olson Construction Company, General Contractor.[7]

b. The architectural drawings are dated November 18, 1915; the cornerstone was laid April 19, 1916; and the doors opened November 1, 1916.[8]

c. The partnership of Fiske & Meginnis was announced on January 4, 1915 with a notice in the Lincoln Daily News reading in part "NEW FIRM Ferd C. Fiske, Architect, has associated with him H. W. Meginnis under the firm name of Fiske and Meginnis, Architects, with offices in the Bankers Life Insurance Building. Mr. Meginnis is not a stranger to Lincoln, having lived here four or five years prior to 1910. The past five years he has been in the east, most of the time in Indianapolis, where he has been practicing his profession. Mr. Fiske is well know here, having come to Lincoln in 1997. We bespeak for the new firm a very liberal share of patronage." The advertisement concludes with a listing of a dozen "of the latest buildings planned and supervised in Mr. Fiske's office."[13]

d. The Lincoln newspaper noted that the plans for the new F Street Fire Station were prepared by the City Engineering Department, with assistance from Fiske & Meginnis. "This new F street station will introduce the bungalow type--something of a departure from the old and existing barn-like structures." The Fire Station and adjacent Wagner & Walt store, also by Fiske & Meginnis, are both Tudor Revival in style. The buildings have been combined into the F Street Community Center, with a gymnasium and other contemporary additions.[82]

e. Records at First-Plymouth Congregational Church note that church trustee F. C. Fiske served on the church building committee when the congregational authorized "to go ahead and put the necessary repairs on the present building, both inside and out...the plans and estimates furnished by Mr. Fiske."[85]

f. From March through September 1915, Fiske & Meginnis published a weekly residential design in the (Lincoln, Nebraska) Sunday State Journal. Some appeared to be unbuilt projects, other were illustrated with photographs of completed houses, ranging from projects as early as the 1902 Tetters House to the Burkett House of 1914. Few, if any, of the projects were the products of the newly commenced Fiske & Meginnis partnership, which had just begun in January 1915, but Fiske and Meginnis had been associated as architect and draftsman since the turn of the century.[86]

g. The Fiske & Meginnis design was for a frame church above a basement, with a steep gable roof, located towards the south end of the lot at the southeast corner of 8th and B Streets in Lincoln. A note on the drawings suggest that the brick foundation was planned to carry brick walls of a future church. Lincoln architect A. W. Woods designed the subsequent church for the congregation in 1927, filling the lot. It has not been determined whether the second church utilized the earlier foundation for the south portion of the later construction.[93]

References

1. B984, Butler County Postcard Collection, Nebraska State Historical Society.

2. Nebraska State Library Commission files.

3. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places within the Mount Emerald and Capitol Additions Historic District. See National Register narrative.

4. Lincoln Star (January 27, 1930), obituary of Ferdinand Fiske.

5. Tom Kaspar, comp. Inventory of architectural records in the archives of Davis Fenton Stange Darling, Architects, Lincoln, Nebraska. 1996. Nebraska State Historical Society, RG3748, Box 16.

6. “Opening of Arcadia Township Library,” (1917). Nebraska State Historical Society, County files (Library), accessed October 25, 2011, http://blog.nebraskahistory.org/?p=2805

7. The American Contractor XLIII:3 (January 21, 1922), 86. Contract awarded.

8. Files of the Plattsmouth Public Library, Plattsmouth, Nebraska; courtesy of Karen Mier, Librarian, March 9, 2016.

9. “Store for Mr. Fred Roos,” Floor Plans.

10. “A Bungalow” [plans for Design No. 103], Sunday State Journal (September 5, 1915), 10.

11. Zimmer, Ed., Harry Meginnis Biography (Lincoln: City of Lincoln, 2006).

12. American Contractor (February 9, 1918), 33; (March 2, 1918), 48, 68.

13. "New Firm," Lincoln Daily News (January 4, 1915), 2.

14. "To Demonstrate House Furnishing. New Addition at Hardy's Will Contain Floor of Model Bungalows. Two Stories to be Added at Cost of $50,000--Unique Features," The Lincoln Star (July 11, 1915), 2.

15. "$10,000 Present for Park Building," Lincoln Star (February 27, 1916), 11.

16. “New Residence of Dr. W. H. Slattery, North Fourteenth Street, Near Belmont,” photo captioned "Fiske & Meginnis, Architects," Sunday (Lincoln, Nebraska) State Journal (January 8, 1922).

17. “New Home of Lincoln Country Club Nears Completion," (photo and floor plans labeled Fiske & Meginnis, Archts), Lincoln (Nebraska) State Journal (January 7, 1923).

18. City of Lincoln Building Permit 11744, issued September 1923, estimated cost of construction: $12,000.

19. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places within the Boulevards Historic District. See National Register narrative.

20. City of Lincoln Building Permit 5952, issued April 21, 1915, estimated cost of construction: $8,500.

21. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6358, issued December 9, 1915, estimated cost of construction: $5,000.

22. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6498, issued April 4, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $10,000.

23. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6522, issued April 20, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $10,000.

24. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6538, issued May 1, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $15,000.

25. City of Lincoln Building Permit 5952, issued April 21, 1915, estimated cost of construction: $8,500.

25. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7486, issued June 11, 1918, estimated cost of construction: $13,793.

26. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7487, issued June 11, 1918, estimated cost of construction: $13,793.

27. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7481, issued June 6, 1918, estimated cost of construction: $6,000.

28. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7896, issued May 15, 1919, estimated cost of construction: $6,500.

29. City of Lincoln Building Permit 8120, issued August 25, 1919, estimated cost of construction: $74,890.

30. City of Lincoln Building Permit 8290, issued April 21, 1919, estimated cost of construction: $14,000.

31. City of Lincoln Building Permit 8712, issued August 21, 1920, estimated cost of construction: $360,000.

32. City of Lincoln Building Permit 9168, issued June 22, 1921, estimated cost of construction: $8,000.

33. City of Lincoln Building Permit 9252, issued August 5, 1921, estimated cost of construction: $15,000.

34. City of Lincoln Building Permit 9579, issued December 28, 1921, estimated cost of construction: $318,000.

35. City of Lincoln Building Permit 9658, issued February 23, 1922, estimated cost of construction: $549,000.

36. City of Lincoln Building Permit 9696, issued March 11, 1922, estimated cost of construction: $50,000.

37. City of Lincoln Building Permit 10904, issued March 29, 1923, estimated cost of construction: $50,000.

38. City of Lincoln Building Permit 11450, issued July 28, 1923, estimated cost of construction: $15,000.

39. City of Lincoln Building Permit 11618, issued September 24, 1923, estimated cost of construction: $3,500.

40. City of Lincoln Building Permit 12024, issued January 17, 1924, estimated cost of construction: $25,000.

41. City of Lincoln Building Permit 12198, issued April 1, 1924, estimated cost of construction: $6,000.

42. City of Lincoln Building Permit 13293, issued January 15, 1924, estimated cost of construction: $15,000.

43. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places within the Lincoln Haymarket Historic District. See National Register narrative and National Register photos.

44. City of Lincoln Building Permit 9170, issued 1921.

45. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6470, issued March 28, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $16,500.

46. "A Few of Lincoln's Modern Homes...Designed by Fiske & Meginnis," Sunday State Journal (Lincoln, Nebraska) (January 7, 1917), C-9.

47. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6229, issued September 13, 1915, estimated cost of construction: $2,400.

48. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6076, issued June 23, 1915, estimated cost of construction: $4,000.

49. City of Lincoln Building Permit 5848, issued March 11, 1915, estimated cost of construction: $1,000.

50. City of Lincoln Building Permit 5993, issued May 7, 1915, estimated cost of construction: $10,000.

51. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6281, issued October 14, 1915, estimated cost of construction: $1,400.

52. City of Lincoln Building Permit 5927, issued April 15, 1915, estimated cost of construction: $10,000.

53. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6130, issued July 28, 1915, estimated cost of construction: $25,000.

54. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6443, issued March 20, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $2,200; Permit 6837, issued October 30, 1916, September 25, 1916.

55. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6888, issued December 7, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $25,000.

56. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6634, issued June 13, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $5,000.

57. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6381, issued January 10, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $15,000.

58. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6540, issued May 1, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $500.

59. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6673, issued July 6, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $2,000.

60. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6604, issued May 31, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $5,000.

61. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6532, issued April 28, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $5,500.

62. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6529, issued April 26, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $4,500.

63. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6749, issued August 31, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $5,000.

64. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6744, issued August 25, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $25,000.

65. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6515, issued April 15, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $10,000.

66. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6437, issued March 16, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $5,000.

67. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6410, issued March 2, 1916, estimated cost of construction: $8,000.

68. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7264, issued November 3, 1917, estimated cost of construction: $5,000.

69. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7556, issued August 21, 1918, estimated cost of construction: $5,500.

70. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7489 , issued June 12, 1918, estimated cost of construction: $800.

71. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7320, issued February 9, 1918, estimated cost of construction: $500.

72. City of Lincoln Building Permit 8308, issued December 20, 1919, estimated cost of construction: $5,000.

73. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7142, issued July 9, 1917, estimated cost of construction: $1,000.

74. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7328, issued April 23, 1919, estimated cost of construction: $5,000.

75. City of Lincoln Building Permit 8280, issued November 20, 1919, estimated cost of construction: $1,500.

76. City of Lincoln Building Permit 8109, issued August 18, 1919, estimated cost of construction: $19,000.

77. City of Lincoln Building Permit 7585, issued September 7, 1919, estimated cost of construction: $29,850.

78. City of Lincoln Building Permit 8195, issued October 2, 1919, estimated cost of construction: $2,000.

79. "Residence designed by Fiske & Meginnis for W. E. Hardy" and "Residence designed by Fiske & Meginnis for Emory C. Hardy," (Lincoln) Nebraska State Journal (January 7, 1917), with renderings.

80. "W. E. Hardy [house]--Near Sheridan Blvd." and "E. C. Hardy [house]--Near Sheridan Blvd. Fisk & Meginniss [sic]--Architects for Hardy Homes," (Lincoln) Nebraska State Journal (January 6, 1918), with photos.

81. "Hebron: Nebraska's Porch Swing Capital--Library," http://www.hebronnebraska.us/229/Library Accessed April 10, 2017.

82. "Proposed New F Street Fire Station: Lincoln’s First Bungalow Type Structure Ready by Fall,” Sunday (Lincoln, Nebraska) State Journal (June 1, 1924), (illus.).

83. City of Lincoln Building Permit 11819, issued 1923, estimated cost of construction: $35,000. On "Rampark" site.

84. “Falls City—Bank and Temple—Richardson County State Bank and Masonic Building Association having plans prepared by Fiske & Meginnis, architects, 533 Bankers Life Building, Lincoln, for 3-story, 50x143-ft., reinforced concrete and brick. About $100,000.” The Bridgemen (19:271, 1919).

85. "Extracts from Clerk’s Record Books, 1866-1965," mss. at First-Plymouth Congregational Church, Lincoln, Nebraska, p. 22.

86. Fiske & Meginnis, weekly feature in the (Lincoln, Nebraska) Sunday State Journal (March 21 through September 12, 1915).

87. City of Lincoln Building Permit 6130, 1915, estimated cost of construction: $25,000.

88. City of Lincoln Building Permit 10840, issued March 9, 1923, estimated cost of construction: $12,000.

89. City of Lincoln Building Permit 10152, issued June 8, 1922, estimated cost of construction: $12,000.

90. City of Lincoln Building Permit 10902, issued March 28, 1923, estimated cost of construction: $10,000.

91. City of Lincoln Building Permit 12209, issued April 3, 1924, estimated cost of construction: $10,000.

92. City of Lincoln Building Permit 12568, issued June 27, 1924, estimated cost of construction: $15,000.

93. City of Lincoln Building Permit, issued 1916, with associated drawings.

Page Citation

D. Murphy and E. F. Zimmer, “Fiske & Meginnis, Architects,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, February 23, 2019. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, May 25, 2020.


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