Difference between revisions of "Findley & Shields, Architects"

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[[William E. Findley (1849-1908), Architect|William E. Findley]], Omaha, Nebraska
 
[[William E. Findley (1849-1908), Architect|William E. Findley]], Omaha, Nebraska
  
[[Alexander Shields, Architect|Alexander Shields]], Omaha, Nebraska
+
[[Alexander Shields (1851-1927), Architect|Alexander Shields]], Omaha, Nebraska
  
 
'''Findley & Shields''' was an architectural partnership that operated in Omaha during the late part of the nineteenth century.
 
'''Findley & Shields''' was an architectural partnership that operated in Omaha during the late part of the nineteenth century.

Revision as of 14:38, 31 January 2017

Omaha, Nebraska, 1888-1893

Partners:

William E. Findley, Omaha, Nebraska

Alexander Shields, Omaha, Nebraska

Findley & Shields was an architectural partnership that operated in Omaha during the late part of the nineteenth century.

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the Format and contents of Nebraska architect entries page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Omaha, Nebraska, 1888-1893

Educational & Professional Associations

Buildings & Projects

Dated

House (1888), 1043 Park Ave., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0205-103)

Georgia Apartments (1889-1890), 1040 S 29th St, Omaha, Nebraska.[3][4] (DO09:0205-002) NRHP form and photos

W. Homan house (1889), 3647 Charles, Omaha, Nebraska.[3]

A. Nields house (1889), 3010 Mason, Omaha, Nebraska.[3]

J. Van Closter doublehouse (also known as the Welsh Apartments) (1889), 1039 Park Ave, Omaha, Nebraska.[3][5] (DO09:0205-026)

H. Deiss house (1889), 2122 Spencer, Omaha, Nebraska.[3] (DO09:0140-145)

Memmen Apartments (1889), 2214 Florence Blvd., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0136-041)

Mason Terrace & Van Closter House (1889-1890), 1001 Park Ave., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0205-001)

Rowhouse (1890), 1001 N. 29th St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0215-005)

W. D. Mead, Jr. doublehouse (1890), 1029-31 S 30th Ave, Omaha, Nebraska.[3] (DO09:0206-046)

J. Van Closter Apartment Building (1890), 2961 Pacific, Omaha, Nebraska.[3]

Pacific Street Rowhouse (1890), 2959-69 Pacific St. 1101 S Omaha, Nebraska. (DO09:0204-011)

House (1892), 1924 S. 35th St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0200-035)

Morse-Coe Shoe Co. Building (1892-1894), 1119-1123 Howard St., Omaha, Nebraska.[3][4][5] (DO09:0121-014)

Undated

Corn Show Building (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1][2]

Dundee Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1]

Emmanuel Baptist Church (n.d.), Omaha, Nebraska.[1]

Notes

References

1. Omaha Evening Bee (December 21, 1908), 11:6.

2. Omaha Morning World-Herald (December 22, 1908), 5:4.

3. Landmarks, Inc., An Inventory of Historic Omaha Buildings (Omaha: City of Omaha and Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission, 1980), 73, 109, 147, 158, 170, 76, 152, 135.

4. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

5. City of Omaha Planning Department, Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission, Database, Query on Architects, May 20, 2002; courtesy of Lynn Meyer, Preservation Planner.

Page Citation

D. Murphy, “Findley & Shields, Architects,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, December 9, 2014. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, August 9, 2020.


Contact the Nebraska State Historic Preservation Office with questions or comments concerning this page, including any problems you may have with broken links (see, however, the Disclaimers link at the bottom of this page). Please provide the URL to this page with your inquiry.