Difference between revisions of "Craddock & Hay, Architects"

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DBA: '''[[Craddock & Hay, Architects|Craddock & Hay]]''', Lincoln, Nebraska
 
DBA: '''[[Craddock & Hay, Architects|Craddock & Hay]]''', Lincoln, Nebraska
  
'''[[James Henry Craddock (1856-1932), Architect|James Henry Craddock]]''' and '''[[Alexander Hay (1858-1937), Architect|Alexander Hay]]''' announced an architectural partnership in Lincoln, Nebraska in February 1890. They offered two unsuccessful proposals for Lincoln school buildings in March and May 1890. In July 1890, Hay and his wife departed Lincoln for Boston and in September of that year he was mentioned in a Lincoln newspaper as "formerly of this city, but now of Lowell, Mass."[[#References|[1][2][3]]]
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'''[[James Henry Craddock (1856-1932), Architect|James Henry Craddock]]''' and '''[[Alexander Hay (1858-1937), Architect|Alexander Hay]]''' announced an architectural partnership in Lincoln, Nebraska in February, 1890. They offered two unsuccessful proposals for Lincoln school buildings in March and May, 1890. In July, 1890, Hay and his wife departed Lincoln for Boston and in September of that year he was mentioned in a Lincoln newspaper as "formerly of this city, but now of Lowell, Mass."[[#References|[1][2][3]]]
 
   
 
   
 
This page is a contribution to the publication, '''[[Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects]]'''. See the [[Format and contents of Nebraska architect entries|format and contents]] page for more information on the compilation and page organization.
 
This page is a contribution to the publication, '''[[Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects]]'''. See the [[Format and contents of Nebraska architect entries|format and contents]] page for more information on the compilation and page organization.
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==Notes==
 
==Notes==
a.  
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a. In March, 1890, Craddock & Hay were among a dozen architectural practices which offered designs for a high school to the Lincoln, Nebraska Board of Education.  Their design was not among the half-dozen chosen for further consideration, and ultimately none of the plans advanced to construction.  In May the partners offered a proposal for "a school building in northeast Lincoln" along with four other Lincoln offices ([[William S. Gray (1851-1927), Architect|William Gray]], [[Otis H. Placey (ca. 1829-1892), Architect|O. H. Placey]], [[W. R. Parsons & Son ( -1907), Architects|W. R. Parsons & Son]], and [[George W. Shaffer (1840-1917), Architect|"Mr. Shaffer"]] and [[Francis M. Ellis (1837-1899), Architect|F. M. Ellis]] of Omaha. Clinton Elementary School was built in 1890-1891 from the Parsons & Sons plans.[[#References|[4][5][6]]]
  
 
==References==  
 
==References==  
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3. "Rambling Remarks," ''(Lincoln) Nebraska State Journal'' (September 21, 1890), 4.
 
3. "Rambling Remarks," ''(Lincoln) Nebraska State Journal'' (September 21, 1890), 4.
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4. "Help School Plans--The Board of Education Gives Audience to a Dozen Architects," ''Lincoln (Nebraska) Evening Call'' (March 27, 1890), 1.
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5. "The School Board--A Plan Adopted for a Building in Northeast Lincoln," ''Lincoln (Nebraska) Evening Call'' (May 23, 1890), 8.
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6. Carl Yost, "Abstracts from the Minutes of the Lincoln Board of Education", ''TS'', c. 1930, 44. Typescript in Lincoln Public Schools archive.
  
 
==Acknowledgements==
 
==Acknowledgements==

Latest revision as of 14:20, 26 May 2020

Lincoln, Nebraska, 1890

DBA: Craddock & Hay, Lincoln, Nebraska

James Henry Craddock and Alexander Hay announced an architectural partnership in Lincoln, Nebraska in February, 1890. They offered two unsuccessful proposals for Lincoln school buildings in March and May, 1890. In July, 1890, Hay and his wife departed Lincoln for Boston and in September of that year he was mentioned in a Lincoln newspaper as "formerly of this city, but now of Lowell, Mass."[1][2][3]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Not listed in Nebraska directories.

Educational & Professional Associations

1890: Craddock & Hay, Architects, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1]

Other Associations

Buildings & Projects

Proposal (unsuccessful) for high school (1890), Lincoln, Nebraska.[4][a]

Proposal (unsuccessful) for elementary school (1890), "in northeast Lincoln," Nebraska.[5][a]

Notes

a. In March, 1890, Craddock & Hay were among a dozen architectural practices which offered designs for a high school to the Lincoln, Nebraska Board of Education. Their design was not among the half-dozen chosen for further consideration, and ultimately none of the plans advanced to construction. In May the partners offered a proposal for "a school building in northeast Lincoln" along with four other Lincoln offices (William Gray, O. H. Placey, W. R. Parsons & Son, and "Mr. Shaffer" and F. M. Ellis of Omaha. Clinton Elementary School was built in 1890-1891 from the Parsons & Sons plans.[4][5][6]

References

1. "Ready for Work. Craddock & Hay, Architects, Fling Their Banner to the Breeze," (Lincoln, Nebraska) Evening Call (February 8, 1890), 5.

2. "Personal," Lincoln (Nebraska) Evening Call (July 16, 1890), 5.

3. "Rambling Remarks," (Lincoln) Nebraska State Journal (September 21, 1890), 4.

4. "Help School Plans--The Board of Education Gives Audience to a Dozen Architects," Lincoln (Nebraska) Evening Call (March 27, 1890), 1.

5. "The School Board--A Plan Adopted for a Building in Northeast Lincoln," Lincoln (Nebraska) Evening Call (May 23, 1890), 8.

6. Carl Yost, "Abstracts from the Minutes of the Lincoln Board of Education", TS, c. 1930, 44. Typescript in Lincoln Public Schools archive.

Acknowledgements

Page Citation

E. F. Zimmer, “Craddock & Hay, Architects,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, May 26, 2020. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, December 7, 2022.


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