Charles Russ Richards (1871-1941), Architect & Engineer

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Lincoln, Nebraska, 1892-1909

Charles Russ Richards was born on March 23, 1871 in Indiana to Sarah Watt and Charlie Richards. He received his Bachelor's and Master's in mechanical engineering at Purdue University in 1891.[3] He married Marcia Alida Russell Beadsley in 1891. He began a long career of teaching at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln in 1892.[6] He quickly became professor of Mechanical Engineering at UNL, and worked to renovate the Electrical Engineering building. He was the first dean of the College of Engineering at UNL, and designed Richards' Hall before he left Nebraska in 1911.[6] Charles Richards died on April 17, 1941.[1][3]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Educational & Professional Associations

1890: B.M.E., Purdue University, Indiana.[1][3]

1891: M.E., Purdue University, Indiana.[1][3]

1891-1892: instructor of manual training, Fort Collins, Colorado.[1][3]

1892-1895: Professor of Manual Training, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][3][6]

1896-1898: director, School of Mechanic Arts, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[6]

1898-1911: Professor of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][3]

1903-1905: Head of Athletic Committee, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][3][5]

1907: Associate Dean of Engineering, Industrial College, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][3][6]

1909: Dean, College of Engineering, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][3][6]

1911: Dean, Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois.[1][3][6]

1922-1935: President, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.[1][3][6]

Buildings & Projects

Extension on Electrical Engineering Building (1892), University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1]

Media Arts Hall (1895), University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1]

Addition to Electrical Engineering Building (1896), University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1]

1811 A St. (ca. 1900), Lincoln, Nebraska.[3]

Richards' Home (1902), 1803 A. St., Lincoln, Nebraska.[1]

Brace Laboratory (1904), University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][5][6]

Lincoln Municipal Power Plant (1905), A St. & Antelope Cre, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1]

Mechanical Engineering Laboratories - Richards' Hall, (1909-1911), University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.[1][3][4][5][6]

Notes

References

1. D. Murphy, Notes on "Mike Hootman, Charles Russ Richards: Architect, Engineer and Educator" Lincoln Brown Bag (Preservation Association of Lincoln Brown Bag, January 11, 2011).

2. "Charles Russ Richards" FindAGrave Accessed January 9, 2019 via https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/59069156

3. Jim McKee, "Charles Russ Richards and his building" Lincoln Journal Star (July 20, 2013). Accessed January 9, 2019 via https://journalstar.com/news/local/jim-mckee-charles-russ-richards-and-his-building/article_0aae4db2-c2bc-5456-9393-091cc2ec3787.html

4. Kay Logan-Peters “Mechanical Engineering Laboratories (Richards),” Historic Buildings of UNL http://historicbuildings.unl.edu/building.php?b=3 accessed January 15, 2019.

5. Kay Logan-Peters “Brace Laboratory of Physics,” Historic Buildings of UNL http://historicbuildings.unl.edu/building.php?b=13 accessed January 15, 2019.

6. Kay Logan-Peters “C. R. Richards: Dean of Engineering,” Historic Buildings of UNL http://historicbuildings.unl.edu/people.php?peopleID=5 accessed January 15, 2019.

Page Citation

L. Allen, “Charles Russ Richards (1871-1941), Architect & Engineer,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, January 15, 2019. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, August 4, 2020.


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