Burdell “Burd” Frank Miller (1869- ), Architect

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Omaha, Nebraska, 1909-1917; Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1920-1940


Burd Miller was born in October 1869, in Ohio. He was an architect in Omaha and Minneapolis. While in Omaha, he ran his own architectural firm, Burd F. Miller Company. Miller was married to Etta, with whom he had three children.[7][8]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Omaha, Nebraska, 1909-1911, 1913, 1915-1917

Educational & Professional Associations

1880: student, Hinckley, Ohio.[10]

1900: bookkeeper, Omaha, Nebraska.[8]

1909-1915: architect and principal, Burd F. Miller Company, Architects, Omaha, Nebraska.[c]

1920: architect, Minneapolis, Minnesota.[11]

1930: construction engineer, Minneapolis, Minnesota.[12]

1940: supervising architect, Minneapolis, Minnesota.[13]

Buildings & Projects

Dated

Emma S. Clarey house (1908), 1136 S 33rd St, Omaha, Nebraska.[2:91][4] (DO09:0204-022)

G. W. Covert house (1908), 5919 Florence Blvd, Omaha, Nebraska.[2:124][4] (DO09:0154-001)

C. C. Cannom house (1909), 1901 Lothrop, Omaha, Nebraska.[2:142][4] (DO09:0140-019)

House (1910), 1116 S 33rd St, Omaha, Nebraska.[2:91][4](DO09:0204-020)

Joseph Vrana house (1910), 607 S. 38th, Omaha, Nebraska.[3][4][6] (DO09:0317-048)

Johnston house (1910), 2310 Sheridan Blvd, Lincoln, Nebraska.[6] (LC13:D05-512)

Leon J. Nelson house (1911), 3507 Woolworth Ave, Omaha, Nebraska.[2:182][4][6] (DO09:0202-033)

Flat (1911), 609 S. 19th St, Omaha, Nebraska. (DO09:0122-057)

C. H. Ashton house (1912), 3515 Woolworth Ave, Omaha, Nebraska.[2:182][4][6](DO09:0202-031)

State Arsenal-military museum (1913), 17th & Court St, Lincoln, Nebraska.[3][6] (LC13:D11- 017)

Agriculture Hall (1913), aka Industrial Arts Building, State Fairgrounds, Lincoln, Nebraska.[3][5][6][a] (LC13:D11-087)

Bank building (1913), Berwyn, Nebraska.[9][b]

Undated

Agricultural School (n.d.), Curtis, Nebraska.[1]

Building (n.d.), 106 N. 53rd, Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Building (n.d.), 5605 Harney Street, Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Building (n.d.), 101 S. 54th Street, Omaha, Nebraska.[6]

Notes

a. W. J. Assenmacher, contractor.

b. Trenton Building Company (Ernest Rokahr), Contractors, Lincoln, Nebraska.[9]

c. First Omaha directory listing, 1909.

References

1. Plans and specs on file at the University Archives.

2. Landmarks, Inc., An Inventory of Historic Omaha Buildings (Omaha: Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission, 1980).

3. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

4. City of Omaha Planning Department, Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission, Database, Query on Architects, May 20, 2002; courtesy of Lynn Meyer, Preservation Planner.

5. Zach Pluhacek, “Group pushing to save building,” Lincoln Journal-Star (Feb 22, 2010), A1, 8.

6. “Another One Bites the Dust,” Newsletter of the Preservation Association of Lincoln (Spring 2010) Vol. XVIII Issue 1, 2.

7. 1910 United States Census, s.v. “Burdell Miller,” Dundee Precinct, Douglas County, Nebraska, accessed through HeritageQuestOnline.com.

8. 1900 United States Census, s.v. “Burdell F. Miller,” Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, accessed through HeritageQuestOnline.com.

9. Rokahr Family Collection, MS3584, S.2, f.1. Nebraska State Historical Society archives.

10. 1880 United States Census, s.v. “Burdell Miller,” Hinckley, Medina County, Ohio, accessed through AncestryLibrary.com.

11. 1920 United States Census, s.v. “Burd Miller,” District 0169, Minneapolis Ward 8, Hennepin County, Minnesota, accessed through AncestryLibrary.com.

12. 1930 United States Census, s.v. “Burd F. Miller,” District 262, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, accessed through AncestryLibrary.com.

13. 1940 United States Census, s.v. “Burd F. Miller,” 89-426, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, accessed through AncestryLibrary.com.

Page Citation

D. Murphy, “Burdell “Burd” Frank Miller (1869- ), Architect,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, April 16, 2015. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, April 23, 2021.


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