Birger J. Kvenild (1879-1953), Architect

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Omaha, Nebraska, 1916-1953
Kvenild_1937_RG081.jpg
Birger Kvenild, ca. 1937.


Birger J. Kvenild was born in 1879. He grew up in Norway, then immigrated to the US in 1905, during a time when he was travelling for architectural study. He became a naturalized citizen in 1916. Kvenild worked primarily as an architect in Omaha. His wife, Magrit, and their son, John, immigrated to Omaha in 1913, when the son was two years old. Birger built their home and maintained an office there. In 1914, he became a founding member of Omaha Lodge #39 of the Scandinavian Brotherhood of America. Kvenild died July 8, 1953.[7][8][9][10]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Omaha, Nebraska, 1916-1951, 1953

Educational & Professional Associations

1886-1897: Cathedral School, Trondhjam, Norway.[7]

1896-1901: Technical College, Trondhjam, Norway.[7]

1904: K.B. Technische Hochschule, Munchen, Germany.[7]

1904-1906: travelled and studied in Germany, France, England, and America.[7]

1906-1907: architectural draftsman, Brooklyn Rapid Transit.[7]

1907-1910: architectural draftsman, Long Island Railroad.[7]

1911: draftsman, City Engineer, Omaha, Nebraska.

1912-1915: draftsman, Misener & Stockham Architects, Omaha, Nebraska.[7]

1915-1918: secretary and architect-in-charge of City Planning Commission, Omaha, Nebraska.[7][10]

1919-1937: architect, Omaha, Nebraska.

1937: Registered Professional Architect, Nebraska, December 22, 1937; A-22.[7]

1937-1953: architect, Omaha, Nebraska.

Architectural Study Travel

Travelled and studied in Germany, France, England, and America.[7]

Buildings & Projects

Kvenild Residence (1913), 3510 Pine Street, Omaha, Nebraska.

David P. Abbott house (1913), 3316 Center, Omaha, Nebraska.[3:108][5] (DO09:0202-050)

Magrit and Birger Kvenild house (ca. 1913-1914), 3510 Pine St, Omaha, Nebraska.[10]

House with carriage barn (1914), 722 S. 37th, Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0317-042)

Chiodo Apartments (1916-1918), 2552 Marcy, Omaha, Nebraska.[3:145][5][12] (DO09:0205-003)

Dwelling for A. Houban (1922), 1937 Park Ave, Omaha, Nebraska.[3:160][5] (DO09:0199-003)

Chiodone Hall (1924), 1101-1117 S. 24th St, Omaha, Nebraska.[5][11] (DO09:0118-001)

House (1925), 672 N. 56th St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0436-017)

House (1925), 710 N. 57th St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0438-023)

Commercial Building (1926), 2401 Harney St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0209-052)

House (1927), 2337 N. 55th St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0444-063)

Henry B. Neff house (1928-1929), 2884 Iowa, Omaha, Nebraska.[2][3:137][4][5] (DO09:0245-001) National Register narrative

House (1928), 672 N. 57th St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0436-034)

House (1928), 711 N. 58th St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0438-064)

House (1929), 5302 Izard St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0438-193)

House (1931), 705 N. 57th Ave., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0438-039)

House (1932), 710 N. 58th St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0438-078)

House (1932), 674 N. 57th Ave., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0436-057)

House (1933), 710 N. 56th St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0438-010)

House (1933), 2316 N. 52nd St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0444-142)

House (1933), 2320 N. 52nd St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0444-143)

House (1933), 2024 N. 52nd St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0444-155)

Duplex (1934), 5114-16 Chicago St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0433-036)

Duplex (1934), 506-508 S. 52nd St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0430-013)

Stone Duplex (1934), 502-504 S. 52nd St., Omaha, Nebraska.[4][5] (DO09:0430-001)

Stone Duplex (1936), 306 S. 56th St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0432-001)

Stone Duplex (1936), 121-123 S. 54th St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0432-002)

Stone Duplex (1936), 5202 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebraska.[5] (DO09:0438-001)

Stone Duplex (1936), 5205 Chicago St., Omaha, Nebraska. [5] (DO09:0434-001)

Doublehouse for C. Walsh (1936), 306 S 56th St, Omaha, Nebraska.[3:102]

Doublehouse for C. Walsh (1936), 5205 Chicago, Omaha, Nebraska.[3:109]

Publications

Kenneth Bjork, Saga in Steel and Concrete: Norwegian Engineers in America (Northfield, Minn.: Norwegian-American Historical Association, 1947), 414.

Notes

References

1. Photo of a home of Tudor type in Omaha World Herald (October 7, 1928), 11E.

2. Architect's drawing of the new steel-frame house in Omaha called “the only all-steel house in this part of the country,” in Omaha World-Herald (October 21, 1928), 8-D.

3. Landmarks, Inc., An Inventory of Historic Omaha Buildings (Omaha: City of Omaha and Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission, 1980).

4. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

5. City of Omaha Planning Department, Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission, Database, Query on Architects, May 20, 2002; courtesy of Lynn Meyer, Preservation Planner.

6. AIA Historical Directory of American Architects: A Resource Guide to Finding Information About Past Architects, accessed May 18, 2010, http://communities.aia.org/sites/hdoaa/wiki/Wiki%20Pages/ahd1025179.aspx

7. Application for Registration to Practice Professional Engineering and Architecture, Nebraska State Board of Examiners for Professional Engineers and Architects, November 10, 1937. Nebraska State Historical Society RG081 SG2.

8. Omaha Daily Bee (December 14, 1914), 12.

9. 1920 United States Census, s.v. "Birger J. Kvenild," Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, accessed through HeritageQuestOnline.com.

10. “Henry B. Neef House,” National Register of Historic Places, Registration Form (Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, December 17, 2009), 8-13. Online

11. City of Omaha Building Permit 630, April 15, 1924; transcription of data in NeHBS site file, DO09:118-001; architect, Kvenild, and owner and builder, Vincenzo Pietro Chiodo (1869-1949), Builder-Architect.

12. City of Omaha Building Permit 1432, December 14, 1916; transcription of data in NeHBS site file, DO09:205-003; architect, Kvenild, and owner and builder, Vincenzo Pietro Chiodo (1869-1949), Builder-Architect.

Page Citation

D. Murphy, “Birger J. Kvenild (1879-1953), Architect,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, February 3, 2015. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, October 19, 2019.


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