Difference between revisions of "Arthur Erwin Duerschner (1922-1990), Architect"

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<div style="white-space:nowrap;font-size:125%">'''Lincoln, Nebraska, 1947-1976'''</div style="white-space:nowrap;font-size:125%">
 
<div style="white-space:nowrap;font-size:125%">'''Lincoln, Nebraska, 1947-1976'''</div style="white-space:nowrap;font-size:125%">
  
'''Arthur Edwin Duerschner''' was born in Sacramento, California on February 20, 1922.[[#References|[1]]] Duerschner attended Concordia College for one year, from 1940-1941, after which he attended the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, earning his Bachelor of Arts in Architecture in 1943.[[#References|[4][5][6]]] From 1943–1946, Duerschner served in the United States Army, after which he worked for the firm of [[Clark & Enersen, Architects]] as a Designer–Draftsman until 1955.[[#References|[4]]] He was married in 1947 and had two kids.[[#References|[4][5][6]]] He was also active in the Nebraska chapter of the AIA and the Lutheran Alumni group of the University of Nebraska, and he was a member of Junior C of C.[[#References|[4]]] Duerschner died on November 16, 1990.[[#References|[1]]]  
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'''Arthur Edwin Duerschner''' was born in Sacramento, California on February 20, 1922.[[#References|[1]]] Duerschner attended Concordia College for one year, from 1940-1941, after which he attended the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, earning his Bachelor of Arts in Architecture in 1943.[[#References|[4][5][6]]] From 1943–1946, Duerschner served in the United States Army, after which he worked for the firm of [[Clark & Enersen, Architects]] as a Designer–Draftsman until 1955.[[#References|[4]]] He was married in 1947 and had three children.[[#References|[4][5][6][10]]] He was also active in the Nebraska chapter of the AIA and the Lutheran Alumni group of the University of Nebraska, and he was a member of Junior C of C.[[#References|[4]]] Duerschner died on November 16, 1990.[[#References|[1]]]  
  
 
This page is a contribution to the publication, '''[[Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects]]'''. See the [[Format and contents of Nebraska architect entries|format and contents]] page for more information on the compilation and page organization.
 
This page is a contribution to the publication, '''[[Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects]]'''. See the [[Format and contents of Nebraska architect entries|format and contents]] page for more information on the compilation and page organization.
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9. Steve Eveans, et al., ''New Architecture in Nebraska'' (American Society of Architects, Omaha, Nebraska: 1977).  
 
9. Steve Eveans, et al., ''New Architecture in Nebraska'' (American Society of Architects, Omaha, Nebraska: 1977).  
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10. "Duerschner, Charlotte V.," ''Lincoln Journal Star'' (June 8, 2016). Online at https://journalstar.com/lifestyles/announcements/obituaries/duerschner/article_a945321d-0675-57d6-bd30-d01eba1b3d9b.html Accessed July 8, 2020.
  
 
==Page Citation==  
 
==Page Citation==  
  
[[D. Murphy]], “{{PAGENAME}},” {{Template:ArchtPageCitation}} November 21, 2014.  {{Template:ArchtPageCitation2}} {{LOCALMONTHNAME}} {{LOCALDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}}.
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[[D. Murphy]], “{{PAGENAME}},” {{Template:ArchtPageCitation}} July 8, 2020.  {{Template:ArchtPageCitation2}} {{LOCALMONTHNAME}} {{LOCALDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}}.
  
  
  
 
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Latest revision as of 14:30, 8 July 2020

Lincoln, Nebraska, 1947-1976

Arthur Edwin Duerschner was born in Sacramento, California on February 20, 1922.[1] Duerschner attended Concordia College for one year, from 1940-1941, after which he attended the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, earning his Bachelor of Arts in Architecture in 1943.[4][5][6] From 1943–1946, Duerschner served in the United States Army, after which he worked for the firm of Clark & Enersen, Architects as a Designer–Draftsman until 1955.[4] He was married in 1947 and had three children.[4][5][6][10] He was also active in the Nebraska chapter of the AIA and the Lutheran Alumni group of the University of Nebraska, and he was a member of Junior C of C.[4] Duerschner died on November 16, 1990.[1]

This page is a contribution to the publication, Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. See the format and contents page for more information on the compilation and page organization.

Compiled Nebraska Directory Listings

Lincoln, Nebraska, 1953-1976

Educational & Professional Associations

1947-1955: designer-draftsman, Clark & Enersen, Architects, Lincoln, Nebraska.[4]

1955-19__: Arthur Erwin Duerschner, Architect, Lincoln, Nebraska.[4][5][6]

1967-1968: treasurer, AIA, Nebraska Chapter.[6]

1968-1969: secretary, AIA, Nebraska Chapter.[6]

1969-1970: vice president, AIA, Nebraska Chapter.[6]

1970-1971: president, AIA, Nebraska Chapter.[6]

ca. 1980s: City-County Planning Commission.[7]

ca. 1980s: head of Historic Preservation Committee.[7]

Buildings & Projects

Bethany Lutheran Church (1959), Minden, Nebraska.[5]

Lutheran Student Chapel(1959), University of Nebraska Campus, Lincoln, Nebraska.[5]

Peace Lutheran Church (1960), Alma, Nebraska.[5]

Peace Lutheran Church (1960), Arapahoe, Nebraska.[5]

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church (1961), Lincoln, Nebraska.[5]

Vocational Training Center (1966), Beatrice, Nebraska.[6]

Martin Luther Home Dorm (1966), Beatrice, Nebraska.[6]

Sheridan Lutheran Church, Sanctuary (1953), 37th & Sheridan Blvd., Lincoln, Nebraska.[8]

Sheridan Lutheran Church, Sanctuary (1967), 37th & Sheridan Blvd., Lincoln, Nebraska.[2][9:115]

Sheridan Lutheran Church (1968), Lincoln, Nebraska.[6]

T.P. Kennard House Restoration (1968), Lincoln, Nebraska.[6][7]

Nehawka State Bank Addition (1969), Nehawka, Nebraska.[6]

Writings

Arthur Duerschner & James McKee, Lincoln: A Photographic History [7]

Honors & Awards

Sheridan Lutheran Church, K Parish Building selected for exhibition in contemporary religious arts & architecture, by Sioux City, Iowa, Art Center. [4]

1988: AIA honor, College of Fellows.[7]

Notes

a. Executive Director, Nebraska State Board of Architects and Engineers, City of Lincoln, Historic Preservation Commission.

References

1. Social Security Death Index.

2. Reeves, Bob, “Fifty years of growth at Sheridan Lutheran,” Lincoln Journal Star (December 20, 2003), 3C.

3. AIA Historical Directory of American Architects: A Resource Guide to Finding Information About Past Architects, accessed April 27, 2010, http://communities.aia.org/sites/hdoaa/wiki/Wiki%20Pages/ahd1011800.aspx

4. American Institute of Architects, comp., American Architects Directory, First Ed. (New York: R. R. Bowker Co., 1956), 146, accessed March 3, 2010, http://communities.aia.org/sites/hdoaa/wiki/Wiki%20Pages/1956%20American%20Architects%20Directory.aspx

5. American Institute of Architects, comp., American Architects Directory, Second Ed. (New York: R. R. Bowker Co., 1962), 181, accessed April 4, 2010, http://communities.aia.org/sites/hdoaa/wiki/Wiki%20Pages/1962%20American%20Architects%20Directory.aspx

6. American Institute of Architects, comp., American Architects Directory, Third Ed. (New York: R. R. Bowker Co., 1970), 239, accessed April 4, 2010, http://communities.aia.org/sites/hdoaa/wiki/Wiki%20Pages/1970%20American%20Architects%20Directory.aspx

7. Donna Biddle, “Preservationist tells tales of architecture,” The Lincoln Star (September 11, 1989), 1,6.

8. City of Lincoln Building Permit #61879.

9. Steve Eveans, et al., New Architecture in Nebraska (American Society of Architects, Omaha, Nebraska: 1977).

10. "Duerschner, Charlotte V.," Lincoln Journal Star (June 8, 2016). Online at https://journalstar.com/lifestyles/announcements/obituaries/duerschner/article_a945321d-0675-57d6-bd30-d01eba1b3d9b.html Accessed July 8, 2020.

Page Citation

D. Murphy, “Arthur Erwin Duerschner (1922-1990), Architect,” in David Murphy, Edward F. Zimmer, and Lynn Meyer, comps. Place Makers of Nebraska: The Architects. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, July 8, 2020. http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Place_Makers_of_Nebraska:_The_Architects Accessed, December 5, 2020.


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